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13 results for Hazardous wastes
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Record #:
326
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Abstract:
North Carolina should dispose of its hazardous wastes in such a way that its citizens and the environment are protected, the economy remains stable, and those factors that attract people and businesses to the state are not degraded.
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Record #:
376
Abstract:
The microelectronics industry's chemically treating large quantities of silicon crystals could possibly be detrimental to the North Carolina environment, but could expand the state's economic base.
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NC Insight (NoCar JK 4101 .N3x), Vol. 4 Issue 3, Sept 1981, p33-38, f
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Record #:
390
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Governor Jim Hunt has proposed legislation dealing with the various aspects of handling hazardous wastes.
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NC Insight (NoCar JK 4101 .N3x), Vol. 4 Issue 1, Apr 1981, p2-9, il
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Record #:
590
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North Carolina State University leads researchers in solving the hazardous waste disposal crisis.
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North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 48 Issue 10, Oct 1990, p12-15, il
Record #:
25152
Author(s):
Abstract:
North Carolina has ended up as one of eight possible states to serve as a nuclear waste refuge. This waste could be deposited in the state for up to 20 years.
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Currents (NoCar TD 171.3 P3 P35x), Vol. 6 Issue 1, Fall 1986, p2
Record #:
25155
Author(s):
Abstract:
Some of the biggest refuses for hazardous waste can be found in your own home in the form of wood polish, paint, paint remover, cleaning agents and many other culprits.
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Currents (NoCar TD 171.3 P3 P35x), Vol. 6 Issue 1, Fall 1986, p3, 5
Record #:
26456
Author(s):
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Despite there being nearly 5,000 hazardous waste dump sites scattered throughout the United States, legislative actions to alleviate toxic waste problem has been stalled in Congress.
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Friend O’ Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 24 Issue (27) 6, Jun 1980, p6
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Record #:
26660
Author(s):
Abstract:
Directors of the North Carolina Wildlife Federation attended a hazardous waste workshop in Gatlinburg, Tennessee. Discussion covered hazardous substances found in most households, and the siting process for a hazardous waste treatment facility.
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Friend of Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 33 Issue 4, July/Aug 1986, p10, il, por
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Record #:
27468
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Part 1 of a two-part investigation into the disposal of hazardous waste in North Carolina. NC has selected two companies based on their track record and the strength of their proposals. ThermalKEM will build an incinerator to burn hazardous waste and Chem-Nuclear will be in charge of disposing of low-level nuclear waste. Both have been found guilty of violating environmental regulations. Each company’s history, practices, and violations are examined in-depth in Part 1.
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Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 8 Issue 25, July 11-17 1990, p6-9 Periodical Website
Record #:
27893
Author(s):
Abstract:
UNC could overhaul or scrap the new wastewater treatment system at its Bingham Facility. The facility experienced several chemical leaks and discharges within the past year. Neighbors of the facility repeated told UNC their concerns about the facility’s environmental impact. The university may lose a federal grant and be fined by the state for the leaks. Neighbors are concerned about the quality of their water after leaks.
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Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 27 Issue 13, March 2010, p11 Periodical Website
Record #:
31685
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Abstract:
Last fall, a two-year old North Carolina boy died from accidentally eating seed peanuts, which are treated with a very toxic organic phosphate insecticide called Thimet. According to Dr. Shirley Osterhout of the Duke Poison Control Center, more than half of the state’s poisoning cases involved children under four years of age. This article discusses recent cases handled at the center, sources of poison and hazardous waste, and prevention of poisonings.
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Record #:
32525
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Abstract:
Hazardous wastes have become a serious problem in North Carolina, especially with the state’s strong ties to agriculture and industry. O.W. Strickland, head of the Solid and Hazardous Waste Management Branch of the Department of Human Resources, discusses hazardous waste management and regulations.
Source:
We the People of North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 39 Issue 3, Mar 1981, p34-48, il, por
Record #:
33499
Author(s):
Abstract:
In the 1987 State of the Environment Report, two major concerns were the quality and quantity of North Carolina’s water resources, and hazardous and radioactive waste management. According to the report, the state must give priority attention to water and waste management because of the declining role of the federal government in these areas.