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9 results for Death--Causes
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Record #:
8941
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Abstract:
North Carolina ranks second in the total number of reported fatalities and fourth in reported injuries from lightning strikes. Between 1959 and 2004, lightning killed 182 people in the state and injured an additional 550 who survived. The high incidence of strikes is directly related to the large number of North Carolinians who engage in outdoor activities, either for work or pleasure. In 1907, fifty Cape Fear Power Company construction workers in Chatham County took refuge in a building as a storm approached; lightning struck the structure, killing seven and injuring the rest. This record stood until 1961, when lightning struck a Sampson County tobacco barn, killing eight and injuring four. The record of eight deaths from a single lightning bolt remains unsurpassed in the nation.
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Record #:
29423
Abstract:
This study examined occupational mortality differences among working-age North Carolinians in order to identify associations between cause of death and occupation. An analysis of death certificate data provided clues to occupational health problems, and suggest which occupations need health promotion/disease prevention activities.
Source:
SCHS Studies (NoCar RA 407.4 N8 P48), Vol. Issue 115, May 1999, p1-19, bibl, f
Record #:
29543
Author(s):
Abstract:
Data from deaths during 1968-1972 and the midyear population (1970 Census) were used to examine mortality in thirty-eight North Carolina cities. For the first time, the results provide cities with the opportunity to examine their cause-specific mortality and to investigate possible contributing conditions beyond age, race and sex considerations.
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PHSB Studies (NoCar RA 407.4 N8 P48), Vol. Issue 9, Feb 1978, p1-3, bibl, f
Record #:
29551
Author(s):
Abstract:
Accidental death rates for children and teenagers in North Carolina are considerably higher than those in the nation. During 1974-1978, the majority of deaths among North Carolina residents under age twenty were motor vehicle fatalities, followed by drowning, fires, firearms, strangulation by ingestion, and poisoning.
Source:
PHSB Studies (NoCar RA 407.4 N8 P48), Vol. Issue 17, Dec 1979, p1-7, map, bibl, f
Record #:
31685
Author(s):
Abstract:
Last fall, a two-year old North Carolina boy died from accidentally eating seed peanuts, which are treated with a very toxic organic phosphate insecticide called Thimet. According to Dr. Shirley Osterhout of the Duke Poison Control Center, more than half of the state’s poisoning cases involved children under four years of age. This article discusses recent cases handled at the center, sources of poison and hazardous waste, and prevention of poisonings.
Source:
Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 5 Issue 5, May 1973, p6-7, por
Record #:
35364
Author(s):
Abstract:
Told from the viewpoint of a young boy, the church-goers of a town usually go and pray at the bedside of a dying person until they pass. In this particular case, however, the man who lay in the sickbed was not prayed over because people thought of him as a bad man for drinking and not attending church.
Record #:
35415
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A variant of the tales “Suppose” and “The Well,” about a hypothetical death.
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Record #:
35660
Abstract:
In 1901, Nell Cropsey was murdered. Although her boyfriend was charged with her murder due to circumstantial evidence, the true events were never known. This has caused Nell’s story to become a legend, and different speculations and variations arose from the mystery. Along with the stories came several folksongs about the incident.
Record #:
35378
Author(s):
Abstract:
The author has pulled an excerpt from a book published in 1572 as an example of the feelings that come with the belief that one is about to die.
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