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17 results for PHSB Studies
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Record #:
29522
Author(s):
Abstract:
Within the first nine months of 1976, North Carolina experienced an increase in the divorce rate and a decline in the marriage rate. These trends raise questions as to the changing probabilities for divorce, marriage and remarriage among different age, race, and sex groups of the state’s population, and corresponding effects on fertility and birth rates.
Source:
PHSB Studies (NoCar RA 407.4 N8 P48), Vol. Issue 1, Jan 1977, p1-7, il, bibl, f
Record #:
29534
Author(s):
Abstract:
For nearly two decades, the question of a relationship between health and the mineral content of water has been cause for epidemiological studies. This study addressed this question in North Carolina while examining elevation, water constituents, and other environmental and socioeconomic factors that might be affecting death rates.
Source:
PHSB Studies (NoCar RA 407.4 N8 P48), Vol. Issue 3, Apr 1977, p1-7, bibl, f
Record #:
29536
Author(s):
Abstract:
A recent Public Health Statistics Branch study suggests that occupational distribution contributes to the explanation of death from acute myocardial infarction, lung cancer, and prostatic cancer. Dietary and nutrition factors were determined to be affecting mortality among residents in North Carolina.
Source:
PHSB Studies (NoCar RA 407.4 N8 P48), Vol. Issue 4, May 1977, p1-7, bibl, f
Record #:
29533
Author(s):
Abstract:
This study examined cause-specific mortality by marital status in North Carolina. The death patterns observed suggest that marriage is a relatively healthy and safe institution, whereas divorce and widowhood are associated with circumstances that engender death by violent means or aggravate disease processes.
Source:
PHSB Studies (NoCar RA 407.4 N8 P48), Vol. Issue 2, Feb 1977, p1-7, bibl, f
Record #:
29540
Author(s):
Abstract:
The 1976 North Carolina Citizen Survey provided data related to the health and economic characteristics of the state’s household population. Survey results are presented concerning the health and health care of households and adults in each of North Carolina’s six Health Service Areas.
Source:
PHSB Studies (NoCar RA 407.4 N8 P48), Vol. Issue 7, July 1977, p1-7, bibl, f
Record #:
29539
Author(s):
Abstract:
This study examined the relationship between mortality of North Carolina residents and the signs of the zodiac. The ages and causes of death were compared across each of the twelve horoscope signs. While there are some interesting differences between signs, the results are open to interpretation.
Source:
PHSB Studies (NoCar RA 407.4 N8 P48), Vol. Issue 6, July 1977, p1-6, il, bibl, f
Record #:
29538
Author(s):
Abstract:
Deaths that occur under unexpected conditions for health are considered unnecessary deaths. An unnecessary death index was created to compare county death rates in North Carolina based on causes of death, ages, and overall mortality. Results show that eastern counties generally have higher scores than western counties.
Source:
PHSB Studies (NoCar RA 407.4 N8 P48), Vol. Issue 5, July 1977, p1-7, map, bibl, f
Record #:
29549
Author(s):
Abstract:
While the number of Indian residents is sufficiently large, the Public Health Statistics Branch typically reports data for whites and nonwhites only. At the request of the North Carolina Commission for Indian Affairs, an analysis was done on race-specific birth and mortality data. The results show that vital characteristics of Indians are different when compared to white and black populations.
Source:
PHSB Studies (NoCar RA 407.4 N8 P48), Vol. Issue 15, June 1979, p1-6, bibl, f
Record #:
29548
Author(s):
Abstract:
The causes of two birth defect conditions, congenital tracheoesophageal fistula (TEF) and oesophageal atresia (OA), are poorly understood. An analysis of TEF and OA clusters suggests that women who are within early stages of pregnancy during times of high incidence of Type A influenza are at higher risk of giving birth to a child with TEF or OA.
Source:
PHSB Studies (NoCar RA 407.4 N8 P48), Vol. Issue 14, Mar 1979, p1-5, il, bibl, f
Record #:
29546
Author(s):
Abstract:
There have been certain inconsistencies between recording of residence on birth and death certificates, and Census enumerations of resident populations in North Carolina. In some cases, reported statistics on death, birth and fertility were misleading. The Division of Health Services has adjusted procedures to generate and disseminate more accurate data, and recognizes the need for data specific to cities and small areas.
Source:
PHSB Studies (NoCar RA 407.4 N8 P48), Vol. Issue 12, Oct 1978, p1-7, bibl, f
Record #:
29544
Author(s):
Abstract:
This study examined the number of North Carolina resident deliveries of live births and fetal deaths according to illegitimate, premarital, and postmarital conceptions. The results showed striking similarities between the premarital and illegitimate populations. Fetal and infant mortality were significantly higher in the illegitimate group than the other two groups.
Source:
PHSB Studies (NoCar RA 407.4 N8 P48), Vol. Issue 10, Mar 1978, p1-7, map, bibl, f
Record #:
29550
Author(s):
Abstract:
In the last decade, sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) has become widely recognized as the leading category of postneonatal deaths in North Carolina. Several epidemiologic studies have suggested that SIDS deaths tend to cluster, especially seasonally. This study examined the epidemiology of SIDS cases occurring in North Carolina counties, but the distribution of cases did not cluster.
Source:
PHSB Studies (NoCar RA 407.4 N8 P48), Vol. Issue 16, Dec 1979, p1-7, map, bibl, f
Subject(s):
Record #:
29545
Author(s):
Abstract:
This report highlights results of the 1977 North Carolina Citizen Survey. The results provide information on population characteristics, chronic health problems, health services, health care availability, restricted activity days due to illness, and health-related personal practices.
Source:
PHSB Studies (NoCar RA 407.4 N8 P48), Vol. Issue 11, July 1978, p1-7, bibl, f
Record #:
29547
Author(s):
Abstract:
Widespread concern about the social, economic and health consequences of teenage pregnancy has led to a statewide effort to reduce these pregnancies. This report focuses on the recent childbearing and abortion patterns of North Carolina teenagers.
Source:
PHSB Studies (NoCar RA 407.4 N8 P48), Vol. Issue 13, Mar 1979, p1-7, il, bibl, f
Record #:
29543
Author(s):
Abstract:
Data from deaths during 1968-1972 and the midyear population (1970 Census) were used to examine mortality in thirty-eight North Carolina cities. For the first time, the results provide cities with the opportunity to examine their cause-specific mortality and to investigate possible contributing conditions beyond age, race and sex considerations.
Source:
PHSB Studies (NoCar RA 407.4 N8 P48), Vol. Issue 9, Feb 1978, p1-3, bibl, f