NCPI Workmark
Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

Search Results


6 results for Water--Pollution--Total maximum daily load
Currently viewing results 1 - 6
PAGE OF 1
Record #:
34327
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Environmental Protection Agency’s Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL) Program is under review for changes to the program and water quality standards. In North Carolina, limited resources and multiple objectives hamper the surface water quality monitoring program, but suggest that a rigorous re-evaluation of sample site selection and monitoring frequency could yield some gains. This article discusses how the Neuse River illustrates certain good and bad features of the current TMDL program, and what could be improved.
Record #:
34294
Author(s):
Abstract:
Under a tentative agreement with the United States Environmental Protection Agency on a total maximum daily load (TMDL) for total nitrogen in the Neuse River Estuary, North Carolina will consider initiating a new round of rulemaking for the Neuse River Basin. New rules could be adopted by the end of 2001, depending on water quality assessments.
Record #:
34311
Author(s):
Abstract:
Based on chlorophyll-a predictions from the Neuse Estuary Eutrophication Model, the North Carolina Department of Environment and Natural Resources has recommended no immediate change in the thirty-percent nitrogen reduction goal for the Neuse River Estuary. Scientists caution that changes to the total maximum daily load (TMDL) for total nitrogen could still occur later in the evaluation process.
Record #:
34317
Author(s):
Abstract:
Economists in North Carolina have noted the lack of economic analyses in the Neuse River Basin. Valuation to assess economic costs and benefits of various proposed management options has largely been neglected, and may undermine the Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL) program. Neuse stakeholders representing a range of interest groups will provide a surrogate for direct economic analyses.
Record #:
34332
Author(s):
Abstract:
Effective water quality management is built on a foundation of water quality standards that are expressed in a manner that makes compliance assessment clear and unambiguous. Most surface water quality standards in North Carolina are based on a chemical criterion value and used to determine if a waterbody is compliant. This article gives an overview of the state’s standards and total maximum daily load (TMDL) program.