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7 results for Bats--Research
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Record #:
9595
Author(s):
Abstract:
Angione reports on a new study conducted by the University of North Carolina at Greensboro that makes a connection between bats and the water quality in the state's river and streams.
Source:
Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue , Autumn 2007, p6-11, il Periodical Website
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Full Text:
Record #:
20843
Author(s):
Abstract:
Mary Kay Clark, curator of mammals at the North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences, is the state's most active field researcher on bats. There are fifteen resident bat species in the state and about half of them live in caves or mines. The work of Clark and her assistants focuses on two rare and little-known forest-dwellers--the southeastern myotis and the big-eared bat.
Source:
North Carolina Naturalist (NoCar QH 76.5 N8 N68), Vol. 7 Issue 2, Fall/Win 1999, p2-7, il
Subject(s):
Record #:
28208
Abstract:
Researchers at East Carolina University conducted a study of tiger beetle (Megacephela carolina carolina) behavioral responses to simulations of bat echo location calls. Results reveal a host of acoustic startle response behaviors, suggesting that tiger beetles may have evolved hearing organs as a direct result of the hunting pressures exerted by insectivorous bats.
Record #:
28210
Abstract:
Biologists at the University of North Carolina at Wilmington surveyed bridges in southeastern North Carolina used by bats as day roosts. Their observations reveal patterns in bat diversity and microclimate parameters thought to influence roost-site selection.
Subject(s):
Record #:
28256
Author(s):
Abstract:
Only one published record of the gray bat (Myotis grisescens) from 1968 in North Carolina exists. Recently, gray bats have been documented more frequently during the summer months using a sonar detecting technique. Records indicate that the gray bat is more common and widespread in western North Carolina than previously known.
Subject(s):
Record #:
30043
Abstract:
This study surveyed bats in the Great Dismal Swamp, a forested wetland located in southeastern Virginia and northeastern North Carolina. Before this survey, only five species of bats were known in this area. Observations from bats collected in this study yield four new species in the Dismal Swamp area.
Source:
Brimleyana (NoCar QL 155 B75), Vol. Issue 17, Dec 1991, p17-25, bibl Periodical Website
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Record #:
36158
Author(s):
Abstract:
Information related to bat house construction included ideal sites and times of the year to build. Diagrams and a description outlining steps of the construction process were offered to assure regular occupancy by the otherwise picky dwellers.