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4 results for Sand dune plants
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Record #:
7738
Author(s):
Abstract:
Beach vitex was introduced into the southeastern United States from Korea in the 1980s. Scientists believed the plant could help stabilize sand dunes. Beach vitex now grows as far north as Ocracoke Island and as far south as Florida and Alabama. Heavy concentrations are also found on Bogue Banks, Bald Head Island, and Oak Island. Experts in North Carolina are seeking to have the plant listed as a Federal Noxious Weed. North and South Carolina's two-state task force has worked to stop the plant's spread.
Source:
Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue , Spring 2006, p26-29, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
31225
Author(s):
Abstract:
North Carolina’s beaches and sand dunes are vulnerable to erosion, and therefore depend on sea oats and beach grass for stabilization. David Nash, a doctoral candidate at North Carolina State University, is growing sea oats that may not only help stabilize sand dunes, but also offer farmers an alternative crop. Nash applied tobacco germination techniques to develop a float system for cultivating local sea oat seeds.
Source:
Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 33 Issue 6, June 2001, p16-17, por Periodical Website
Record #:
31269
Abstract:
As the Outer Banks has become barren over time, losing its vegetation, the dunes have come alive and processes of movement have sped up due to storms along the coast. With the Outer Banks protecting more than 1.5 million acres of agriculture and forestry, there is argument for replanting of vegetation on the Outer Banks to provide critical stabilization.
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Record #:
39971
Abstract:
Proving the necessity of dunes is illustrations of the lingering impact of hurricanes on them and coastal ecosystems. Also used as evidence is the process involved with their return. The complexity of dune formation is explained in descriptions and images, which include species vulnerable and resistant to hurricane-generated erosion’s impact.
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