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11 results for Shore protection
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Record #:
1316
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Abstract:
New federal and state administrations assume their positions and begin facing concerns over several state coastal issues, including wetlands, the proposed Oregon Inlet jetties, and shore erosion protection at Fort Fisher.
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Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue , May/June 1993, p10-13, por Periodical Website
Record #:
1406
Author(s):
Abstract:
As North Carolina's coastal communities attempt to deal with beach erosion, beach nourishment appears to be an alternative. High costs and imperfectly understood long-term effects, however, are clear drawbacks.
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Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue , Jan/Feb 1994, p19-22, il Periodical Website
Record #:
3343
Abstract:
Sand dune destruction is common during hurricanes. Mark Kane, a professor at the University of Florida, is researching the genetic code of sea oats to determine which plants will grow best in what areas, to stabilize dunes and combat erosion.
Source:
Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue , May/June 1997, p10-14, il Periodical Website
Record #:
3825
Abstract:
A section of Wrightsville Beach that had been ravaged by Hurricane Fran is 1996 is being restored through a unique approach. The town allowed a Florida grower to harvest sea oat seeds in return for grown plants. Now over 25,000 sea oat plants are helping to stabilize and trap sand on the new dunes.
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Record #:
4654
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Abstract:
Beach erosion is constant. To deal with it, the Coastal Resources Commission uses building relocation and beach renourishment (moving sand from others areas onto eroded beaches). Bulldozing is used as an emergency. Sandbagging is used as a temporary fix. Beach renourishment is controversial, and Smith summarizes the views of the public and environmentalists.
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Record #:
5989
Abstract:
Beach development is a controversial topic. One side feels that development is inevitable, yet manageable; protecting development is paramount with his group. The other side feels beach preservation is the prime issue; they feel that actions to protect development will inevitably damage the shoreline. Dr. Orrin H. Pilkey supports this second view and discusses his views in this CAROLINA PLANNING interview.
Source:
Carolina Planning (NoCar HT 393 N8 C29x), Vol. 6 Issue 2, Fall 1980, p2-6, il, por
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Record #:
7244
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Abstract:
Sturgis paints a grim future for North Carolina's Outer Banks and coastal counties in the twenty-first century. Global warming is predicted to produce rising oceans levels from fourteen inches to three feet, temperature ranges from four to ten degrees higher than current levels, and more powerful tropical storms. Climate change is a vast and serious problem, but in North Carolina many organizations are bringing people together to address this critical problem. Senate Bill 1134 and House Bill 1191 would establish a commission drawn from these various groups to study the problem. Both this group and the proposed legislation faces opposition from politically powerful corporate interests. Meanwhile, the state's coastline continues to erode.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 22 Issue 19, May 2005, p22-27, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
7692
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Abstract:
Orrin Pilkey, Duke University professor emeritus and world expert on beaches, says that when North Carolina tries to protect oceanfront homes through beach renourishment, the projects are actually destroying the beaches. The state must decide on what is more important, the homes or the beaches. At the moment the homes are winning. Pilkey discusses three ways to deal with a retreating beach and problems caused by renourishment. Problems include too much mud in sand pumped onto the beach (Atlantic Beach) and sharp shells that cause painful walking (Emerald Isle). Pilkey lists agencies that have been nonresponsive to the problems of beach renourishment.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 22 Issue 33, Aug 2005, p22-27, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
10310
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Crawford-Douglas poses questions to help communities in North Carolina sort through issues brought on by global warming. These include: Why should there be any action? Who should take action? How can policy makers allocate resources to adaptation or mitigation? How can North Carolinians set priorities?
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Popular Government (NoCar JK 4101 P6), Vol. 73 Issue 3, Spring/Summer 2008, p2-9, il, f
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Record #:
12408
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Abstract:
Hurricane Floyd and Hurricane Dennis affected some 300 miles of state shoreline with flooding, overwash, erosion and wave damage. Spencer Rogers, Sea Grant's coastal construction and erosion specialist, compared damages within the limits of three projects designed by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers with areas outside the projects to determine how well the dune and beach nourishment projects performed.
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Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue , Autumn 2009, p20-21, il Periodical Website
Record #:
16837
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Abstract:
The signature species that inhabits North Carolina's seashore dunes is a grass that mimics oats. It is a species that thrives in harsh conditions--salt, wind, ocean waves, burning sun. They offer storm protection by trapping sand that builds dunes, and they also provide habitats for birds, amphibians, and reptiles. Settlage discusses current research on this unique species.
Source:
Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue , Spring 2012, p6-11, il Periodical Website
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