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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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4 results for Sand dune ecology
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Record #:
3343
Abstract:
Sand dune destruction is common during hurricanes. Mark Kane, a professor at the University of Florida, is researching the genetic code of sea oats to determine which plants will grow best in what areas, to stabilize dunes and combat erosion.
Source:
Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue , May/June 1997, p10-14, il Periodical Website
Record #:
3825
Abstract:
A section of Wrightsville Beach that had been ravaged by Hurricane Fran is 1996 is being restored through a unique approach. The town allowed a Florida grower to harvest sea oat seeds in return for grown plants. Now over 25,000 sea oat plants are helping to stabilize and trap sand on the new dunes.
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Record #:
16837
Author(s):
Abstract:
The signature species that inhabits North Carolina's seashore dunes is a grass that mimics oats. It is a species that thrives in harsh conditions--salt, wind, ocean waves, burning sun. They offer storm protection by trapping sand that builds dunes, and they also provide habitats for birds, amphibians, and reptiles. Settlage discusses current research on this unique species.
Source:
Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue , Spring 2012, p6-11, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
31592
Author(s):
Abstract:
North Carolina’s environmental beach clinics started as an experiment by the Soil Conservation Service four years and continue to be successful. The purpose of the beach clinics was to promote the use of newly developed beach grasses and other vegetation to protect dunes and ocean-front property from eroding or washing away. Participants in the beach clinics learn about native vegetation, planting techniques, and coastal erosion.
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