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9 results for Ney, Amy
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Record #:
16877
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Ney discusses the advantages of buying food that is raised by local farmers. It is estimated the North Carolinians spend $35 billion per year on food purchases. If just 10 percent were spent locally, that would bring $3.5 billion into local economies and provide support to local farmers and provide jobs in the farming community.
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Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 44 Issue 3, Mar 2012, p18-19, il Periodical Website
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16906
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In this second in a series examining the state's trash, Ney discusses the problem with plastic bags. First introduced in grocery stores in the 1970s, now 90 percent of the shopping bags used worldwide are plastic and less than five percent are returned for recycling. Those thrown away endanger wildlife, emit toxic fumes if burned, contaminate soil, and pollute waterways. Ney discusses possible solutions.
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16904
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Ney begins a new series on waste that will examine some of the common items that are environmentally harmful, but are still tossed into landfills, and what can be done about them. North Carolinians throw away nine times more than they recycle. Ney discusses reasons why paper should be recycled.
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Record #:
20173
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Pioneers in the management of American forestry got their start in western North Carolina in the late 1800s. With George Vanderbilt's backing, Carl Alwin Schenck faced the monumental challenge of managing thousands of acres of eroding forestland; together they developed the first map in the US for the purpose of large-scale forest management and established the Biltmore Forest School, the first forestry school in America.
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Record #:
21575
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In North Carolina 84 percent of the woodland is privately owned; over half of that is termed \"family forests.\" This means that a family owns an acre or more with trees on at least one-tenth of it. In the state many owners hold between one and nineteen acres. However, many of these people do not have a management. Ney suggests ways these forests can be kept healthy and growing, and in some cases provide some income.
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Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 46 Issue 2, Feb 2014, p36-37, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
22173
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Invasive plants come in many categories, from trees to grasses. Once in they can take over a landscape and push out the native plants. They can be very difficult and costly to remove. Ney suggests ways to know and grow a native landscape and keep the invasive out.
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Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 43 Issue 0, Aug 2011, p17-18, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
30679
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A riparian buffer is a strip of vegetation along a streambank that helps to protect water and land resources. This article discusses the history of land use and conservation in North Carolina. Also discussed is the importance of buffers in protecting waterways from pollution and sedimentation, and how landowners can plant or maintain a buffer.
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Record #:
30701
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Invasive plants, such as the kudzu vine or oriental bittersweet, are species that have been introduced to North Carolina, either on purpose or accidently, and have spread out of control. A major problem with invasive plants is that they are often innocently used in home landscapes and unintentionally spread into nature. This article discusses the importance of native plant gardening, and how to determine which plants are suitable to different regions of the state.
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Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 43 Issue 8, Aug 2011, p17-18, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
35424
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Among the evidence that the author provided for her premise: reasons to avoid leaving human food accessible; ways to help keep these animals’ natural sources of food available and edible.
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