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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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11 results for Plants--North Carolina
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Record #:
12575
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First planted in 1741-1742 by Eliza Lucas, indigo, a plant known for its blue colored dye, represented the second largest money returning crop in the colonial Carolinas. Shipped to England with cotton and rice, indigo quickly became a valuable commercial commodity, exceeding one million pounds annually in value.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 34 Issue 15, Jan 1967, p11, 13, il
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Record #:
13852
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The Mountains of North Carolina bloom between March and May. Comprising the Blue Ridge and the Great Smoky Mountains, this region boasts fringed orchids, azalea, lady slippers, robin trillium, rhododendron, and numerous varieties of wild flowers. In addition to these beautiful plant species, more than 1,300 tree, shrub, and herb varieties grow, as do 700 species of fungi, 330 mosses and liverworts, and 230 varieties of lichen.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 20 Issue 44, Apr 1953, p2-3, il
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Record #:
14605
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Yaupon and bloodroot are distinctive and popular plants that flourish in North Carolina and are used for beverages, personal adornment, and medicinal purposes.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 13 Issue 44, Mar 1946, p3, f
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Record #:
29869
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Bugbane or black cohosh is a native North Carolina perennial that is easily grown in organically rich and moist soil. The common name of bugbane is a reference to the insect repellent smell the plant gives off, and cohosh comes from an Algonquian word meaning rough. The plant is deer and rabbit resistant, and its flowers provide both nectar and pollen to insects.
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Record #:
29882
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Polk County is home to diverse ecosystems and hundreds of rare plant species. The Pacolet Area Conservancy works to promote stewardship and land protection so that more plant species may be discovered.
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Record #:
30701
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Invasive plants, such as the kudzu vine or oriental bittersweet, are species that have been introduced to North Carolina, either on purpose or accidently, and have spread out of control. A major problem with invasive plants is that they are often innocently used in home landscapes and unintentionally spread into nature. This article discusses the importance of native plant gardening, and how to determine which plants are suitable to different regions of the state.
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Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 43 Issue 8, Aug 2011, p17-18, il
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Record #:
30700
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Western North Carolina has a wide variety of native plants and wildflowers. This article discusses the evolution of plant diversity in the region, how to plant and harvest certain native plant species, and the potential of native plants as an economic aid to farmers.
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Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 43 Issue 8, Aug 2011, p15-16, il, por
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Record #:
34721
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The Wildlife in North Carolina 2016 Photo Competition showcases its winners. Themes include birds, mammals, reptiles & amphibians, invertebrates, wild plants, outdoor recreation, wild landscapes, animal behavior, youth photographer 13-17, youth photographer 12 & under, and grand prize. All photographs are taken in and showcase the beauty of North Carolina. Winning photographs are displayed at the North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences.
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Record #:
34800
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Broccoli is a fairly adaptive vegetable to grow and well-suited for the Carolinas. This article discusses where, when, and how to grow broccoli in your home garden, as well as the best varieties to grow in North Carolina.
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Record #:
34801
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Cauliflower is a more difficult vegetable to grow but is well-suited for some areas in the Carolinas. This article discusses where, when, and how to grow cauliflower in your home garden, as well as the best places to buy seeds in North Carolina.
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Record #:
34828
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Despite citrus plants not naturally occurring in the Carolinas, it is possible to grow them. Lemons, limes, and oranges can all be grown, but must have extra attention to ensure they don’t fail. Follow the tips and tricks in this article to ensure your citrus plants are healthy.
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