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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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8 results for Native plant gardening
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Record #:
4574
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North Carolina is home to hundreds of plants stretching from the coast to the Appalachians. In plant diversity the state is outranked only by California and Texas. These natural plants have become popular with home gardeners. The author describes plants for both shade and sun that will keep gardens remaining colorful from spring through fall.
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Record #:
29869
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Bugbane or black cohosh is a native North Carolina perennial that is easily grown in organically rich and moist soil. The common name of bugbane is a reference to the insect repellent smell the plant gives off, and cohosh comes from an Algonquian word meaning rough. The plant is deer and rabbit resistant, and its flowers provide both nectar and pollen to insects.
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Record #:
30701
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Invasive plants, such as the kudzu vine or oriental bittersweet, are species that have been introduced to North Carolina, either on purpose or accidently, and have spread out of control. A major problem with invasive plants is that they are often innocently used in home landscapes and unintentionally spread into nature. This article discusses the importance of native plant gardening, and how to determine which plants are suitable to different regions of the state.
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Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 43 Issue 8, Aug 2011, p17-18, il
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Record #:
30700
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Western North Carolina has a wide variety of native plants and wildflowers. This article discusses the evolution of plant diversity in the region, how to plant and harvest certain native plant species, and the potential of native plants as an economic aid to farmers.
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Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 43 Issue 8, Aug 2011, p15-16, il, por
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Record #:
31352
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Harry Phillips is the curator of native plants at the North Carolina Botanical Garden at the University of North Carolina in Chapel Hill. In this article, Phillips discusses growing and propagating native wild flowers. He also recommends native perennials, such as sunflowers and butterfly weed, that can be used in garden borders or beds in sunny locations.
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Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 17 Issue 11, Nov 1985, p8-9, il
Record #:
34508
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After inheriting his ancestral farm, agriculturist Don Lee has moved away from growing regular crops like corn and tobacco. Instead, he has transformed it into the Garrett Wildflower Seed Farm, a seed-growing operation for native wildflowers and grassland species. The seeds are bought by landowners that want to restore indigenous landscapes, companies that want to use native plants for utility projects, and projects that endeavor to reestablish pollinator plants for bees and butterflies.
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Record #:
34611
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The monarch butterfly in North America makes its way down to Mexico every year to lay eggs, passing through North Carolina in spring and fall. But with the decline of milkweed and other native plants, the monarch butterfly populations drop as well. North Carolinians can help by growing native species in their gardens.
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North Carolina Naturalist (NoCar QH 76.5 N8 N68), Vol. 22 Issue 2, Spring 2014, p2-3, il
Record #:
34805
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Native gardens are becoming popular as their reputation for minimal upkeep spreads. In North Carolina, indigenous tree species, such as magnolias and southern live oaks, can co-exist with smaller varieties of flower, such as azaleas, hydrangea, and phlox. Moving to native species can cut down on the negative environmental impacts of invasive species.
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