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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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20 results for Flowers
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Record #:
10611
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Three weeds commonly found on the roadsides of North Carolina played an important role in the family routines of the 1800s. Boneset, White snakeroot, and Queen of the Meadow would have all been well known to mountain women for their individual properties. Boneset was used to make Boneset tea, a reputed purge for summer germs and fevers, and White snakeroot was known to be poisonous, most often inducing 'milk sickness' in persons who drank milk from cows that had ingested the weed. Queen of the Meadow was used as a late summer decorative flower that signified the passing of the seasons.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 38 Issue 5, Aug 1970, p13-14, il
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Record #:
12877
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Offering observations related to his travels throughout North Carolina, this excerpt presents details relative to the flora, fauna, topography, and Native Americans encountered by Lawson during his late-17th through early-18th-century visit.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 27 Issue 19, Feb 1960, p10-11, 38, il, map
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Record #:
12903
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The visit of William Bartram in 1776 to Western North Carolina was recorded in his book, Travels. In the fifth installment of his diary offered by The State, Bartram describes the flora of the Overhills towns as well as interactions with local Native Americans.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 27 Issue 11, Oct 1959, p8, 25, il
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Record #:
13352
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Hawse discusses using weeds as food, including recipes for utilizing local indigenous species.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 22 Issue 21, Mar 1955, p14, 16
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Record #:
14990
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In order to promote the beauty of North Carolina's state capital, the Raleigh Park and Recreation Commission decided to plant cannas, an iris-like flower, throughout the city for a unique beautification program.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 10 Issue 35, Jan 1943, p26-27, f
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Record #:
24675
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The author discusses the use of flowers and weeds in North Carolina for food, household needs, and other common remedies.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 22 Issue 21, February 1955, p14, 16
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Record #:
27985
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Large patches of red spider lilies (Lycoris radiata) bloom all around New Bern in mid-September. The lilies were first planted by the Roberts family, and the progeny of the lilies has spread throughout the southeast. In order to grow red spider lilies, horticulturalists should consider several cautionary facts regarding its growing zone.
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Record #:
29681
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Fall-blooming perennials provide pollen and nectar for the bees and beautiful flowers for the garden. Diane Almond, a North Carolina Master Beekeeper, discusses how to create a pollinator garden and offers a list of native plants to grow. Plants native to North Carolina include flowers such as asters, swamp thistle, goldenrod, and chrysanthemums.
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Record #:
34805
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Native gardens are becoming popular as their reputation for minimal upkeep spreads. In North Carolina, indigenous tree species, such as magnolias and southern live oaks, can co-exist with smaller varieties of flower, such as azaleas, hydrangea, and phlox. Moving to native species can cut down on the negative environmental impacts of invasive species.
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Record #:
34883
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After several family emergencies, Sara Edi Boyd of Winston-Salem began to press flowers to find a way to connect family members to their loved ones. People from all over the country request that she press flowers of significance so that they can survive the test of time.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 85 Issue 11, April 2018, p100-108, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
35365
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Found in an old trunk, several miscellaneous writings were found, including this parable about flowers.
Record #:
35432
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The secret world of dandelions covers six of the seven continents. As Julia Steven also noted about this ubiquitous plant, it depends on a certain type of bacteria and fungi for its survival. Included was the scientific study that explored this relationship.
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Record #:
35645
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The secret the author shared in the days after its discovery with three others was a Red Crocus. Though the flower was long since gone from the yard in which it grew, it proved to be much alive in another sense.
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Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 6 Issue 2, Mar/Apr 1978, p26-29
Record #:
35810
Abstract:
The authors asserted them as a healthy and free supplement to the modern American diet: wild plants. To assure the collection is healthy were books such as Walter Muenscher’s Poisonous Plants of the United States and A Guide to Medicinal Plants of the United States. Helping to concoct a recipe for success were plants that could be eaten raw (dandelions and onions), ones that must be cooked (burdock roots and milkweed), and dishes such as dandelion salad.
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Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 7 Issue 2, Mar/Apr 1979, p48-49
Record #:
36192
Abstract:
With the long established health hazards of smoking, it may seem ironic that tobacco would be included with Teosinte, Chiltepin Pepper, and a variety of Petunia as good garden additions. The beauty of its flowers and natural insecticide may make it easier to understand why tobacco is not too far out to consider.
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