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16 results for Goerch, Doris
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Record #:
14509
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Abstract:
The State House, Library, and several private residences were destroyed in the disastrous 1831 fire in Raleigh.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 13 Issue 8, July 1945, p3, il
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Record #:
14814
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Abstract:
The history of shipping throughout the eastern portion of the state began during the colonial period. During that time, trading points were established along the Pamlico Sound in Bath Town, on Lionel Reading and Emanuel Cleaves' plantations, and in Washington for local planters to exchange goods with foreign shippers. Out of those ports listed, Washington became the more integral town. In the 1780s a flourishing trade developed between Washington and points in eastern North Carolina. Washington trade also expanded during this period to Europe and the West Indies.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 11 Issue 10, Aug 1943, p1, 24, por
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Record #:
14990
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In order to promote the beauty of North Carolina's state capital, the Raleigh Park and Recreation Commission decided to plant cannas, an iris-like flower, throughout the city for a unique beautification program.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 10 Issue 35, Jan 1943, p26-27, f
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Record #:
15103
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The town of Dover, North Carolina is about nine miles south of Kinston and has a population of only around 600, but the special thing about Dover is that is has a woman mayor and three women commissioners; they are Mayor Annie Wilson, and commissioners Mrs. J.H. Humphrey, Mrs. R.S. Russell, and Mrs. Sarah Griffin.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 8 Issue 33, Jan 1941, p7, 16, f
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Record #:
15121
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Abstract:
Sampson County, the fourth largest county in North Carolina, is also the largest green corn and pepper market in the world. Sampson County was also the home of a vice president of the United States, William Rufus King, as well as Governor Gabriel Holmes.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 8 Issue 40, Mar 1941, p1-4, 24-25, f
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Record #:
15129
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Abstract:
Chatham County is a great county but it could have been the greatest county in the state if it hadn't missed three golden opportunities including losing locations of: the state capitol to Wake County; the University of North Carolina to Chapel Hill because Chatham County had too many saloons; and the first railroad in the state was to have been built in Chatham, but farmers objected. Despite of all the might-have-been, Chatham is still a county of rich history.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 8 Issue 45, Apr 1941, p1-4, 21-23, f
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Record #:
15127
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Within the county of Wilson, there are 50,000 people as well as the largest tobacco market, the world's largest tobacco warehouse, and according to the citizens of Wilson, the most beautiful street in North Carolina.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 8 Issue 44, Mar 1941, p1-4, 20-21, f
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Record #:
15162
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Abstract:
Rachel Regina Holton defied gender roles in the Antebellum South to become the first female newspaper editor in the state and most likely the South. Born in Richmond, Virginia, she moved to Charlotte after marrying Thomas Jefferson Holton in 1834. Mr. Holton ran a paper called Miners and Farmers Journal, later to become The North Carolina Whig. Mr. Holton died in 1860 and Mrs. Holton met the challenge of editing a paper in her husband's absence. She continued to edit the paper for two years until she settled down to manage her real estate, which supplied her income until her death in 1905.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 9 Issue 44, Apr 1942, p3
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Record #:
15164
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When St. Mary's opened in Raleigh 1842 thirteen girls attended. In 1942, 225 girls attended and ranged in maturation from kindergarten to college ages. Previously it was an Episcopal, all-boys school known as Ravenscroft Grove. Daily activities included: prescribed exercise, prayer time, Bible lessons, and tea breaks. Famous alumni included: Annie Lee, daughter of Robert E. Lee, Margaret Wilson McAdoo, Woodrow Wilson's daughter, and Francis Fisher AKA Christian Reid the famous southern writer.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 9 Issue 49, May 1942, p10, 22, il
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Record #:
17240
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Frederick Koch had a profound effect on the dramatic arts in North Carolina in the early part of the 20th-century. While a professor at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill in 1919, Koch founded the \"Carolina Playmakers,\" one of the most influential repertoire groups of its time.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 6 Issue 52, May 1939, p1, 20, por
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Record #:
18176
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Abstract:
N. W. \"Nick\" Warren of Halifax County served three tours in the U.S. Army, and when he was discharged, an extra sheet had to be added to his papers listing the 127 engagements in which he took part. His first tour was three years, and on the way home the Spanish-American War broke out; he signed for two more years. On the way home from Cuba, soldiers were needed to put down the Boxer Rebellion in China. There he and friends captured the Chinese mint and exchanged many of the silver bars for American money. They dumped much of the rest into the Yangtze River. After escaping a massacre of soldiers in the Philippines, he returned to Halifax County, married, and settled down.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 8 Issue 36, Feb 1941, p1, 16, 18, por
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Record #:
18266
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Reginald Fessenden, one of America's great inventors, spent two years on the coast of North Carolina conducting experiments with wireless. At the same time two other inventors were working nearby--the Wright brothers. However, when North Carolina approved raising $100,000 for a monument to Fessenden, hardly anyone in the state knew who he was or what he did.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 9 Issue 4, June 1941, p17, 24, por
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Record #:
18442
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Meredith College has a unique way of preserving its history. Each year at commencement time a member of the senior class dresses a doll in clothes that represent the class dress of that year. The dolls are two feet high and all alike except the hair color. The practice began in 1902, and there are thirty-nine dolls displayed at graduation.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 9 Issue 23, Nov 1941, p9, 28, il
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Record #:
19103
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Abstract:
Goerch gives examples of the interesting information that can be found in old will documents of the 1700s that are housed in the Historical Commission archives in Raleigh.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 11 Issue 8, July 1943, p7, 19
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Record #:
19155
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Abstract:
Four United States Presidents--Washington, Monroe, Polk, and Fillmore--visited Wilmington, in addition to Jefferson Davis, President of the Confederacy.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 11 Issue 12, Aug 1943, p10, 25
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