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12 results for North Carolina State Capitol (Raleigh)
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Record #:
3033
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An unknown photograph of part of the south front of the State Capitol has been discovered. The picture was taken in the 1870s by Rufus Morgan, one of the state's most accomplished itinerant photographers of the 19th-century.
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Record #:
4958
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The State Capitol of North Carolina is one of the nation's great historic structures. Lea discusses the history of its construction and expansion through the years and the work in the 1990s of Capitol Historian Raymond Beck and historical paint expert George Fore that restored the interior's original 1840s paint scheme.
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Record #:
8746
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This article is a reprint of a story published by the U.S. Veteran Signal Corps Association in October, 1902. It is Lt. Round's first-hand account of the burning of the capitol building in Raleigh in April, 1865.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 48 Issue 1, June 1980, p7-10, il
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Record #:
10438
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Holloman describes the burning of the state's capitol in June 1831. Accounts from the Raleigh newspaper, the RALEIGH REGISTER, are included.
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We the People of North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 22 Issue 10, Mar 1965, p51-52, 54-56, il
Record #:
11970
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Constructed between 1833 and 1840, North Carolina's Capitol building began showing its age by 1970. This article describes the restoration of this historic Raleigh building.
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We the People of North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 38 Issue 6, June 1980, p20, 22, 52, il
Record #:
14509
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The State House, Library, and several private residences were destroyed in the disastrous 1831 fire in Raleigh.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 13 Issue 8, July 1945, p3, il
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Record #:
16957
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Dixon discusses the growth and contributions of North Carolina State College as it begins its forty-ninth year of operation on July 1.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 5 Issue 2, June 1937, p16-17, il
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Record #:
18330
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The North Carolina State Capitol has been a symbol of the state's ambition and liberality over time. Sanders discusses the endurance of the Capitol over the past generations and looks to the future of this central symbol of government.
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Popular Government (NoCar JK 4101 P6), Vol. 43 Issue 2, Fall 1977, p1-10, f
Record #:
22082
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A history of the towns in North Carolina that have served as the colonial or state capitol and how the capitol came to be located in each place.
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Record #:
16113
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The State Capitol building, because of its age, has undergone many phases of construction. Explanations for some of the unique architectural features have become veiled in myth and superstition. Crawl spaces, extra rooms, and tunnels, which exist for functional purposes, have stirred the imagination and become legendary hideouts for Confederate spies.
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Record #:
16108
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On the State Capitol grounds in Raleigh a six week archaeological excavation took place between June and July 1978. Archaeologists were excavating to better understand the history of different state houses destroyed prior to the current structure.
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Record #:
31043
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Abstract:
In Capitol Square in Raleigh, North Carolina lie some of the most intriguing buildings in the region. The Old Capitol has been the home of the Legislature from 1833 to 1963, when sessions were moved to the new $6 million Statehouse. The Revenue Building holds all the money paid to the State, both in the General Fund and money collected for the Highway Fund. Additionally, as 70 cents out of every dollar of the General Fund is spent on education offices for the State Board of Education are housed at the Education Building. Further, highway fund monies are collected by the Highway Commission whose offices reside int he Highway Building.
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