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15 results for Aquatic weeds--North Carolina, Eastern
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Record #:
5219
Abstract:
Giant salvinia, a highly invasive water weed, was discovered in North Carolina in 1998. The plant can double its biomass in about two days and crowd out native plants, reduce oxygen, and degrade water quality. Despite state efforts to control it, salvinia was found in Brunswick, New Hanover, Onslow, and Pender Counties in 2000. The state goal is to eliminate the weed by October 2002.
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Record #:
9754
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Seven aquatic plants threaten some of North Carolina's best waterways. They are the hydrilla, spike rush, elodea, pondweed, filamentous algae, bladderwort, and alligatorweed.
Record #:
10611
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Three weeds commonly found on the roadsides of North Carolina played an important role in the family routines of the 1800s. Boneset, White snakeroot, and Queen of the Meadow would have all been well known to mountain women for their individual properties. Boneset was used to make Boneset tea, a reputed purge for summer germs and fevers, and White snakeroot was known to be poisonous, most often inducing 'milk sickness' in persons who drank milk from cows that had ingested the weed. Queen of the Meadow was used as a late summer decorative flower that signified the passing of the seasons.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 38 Issue 5, Aug 1970, p13-14, il
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Record #:
13782
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Hydrilla, an aquatic weed, has arrived in the state's northern coastal waters. A fast-growing Asian perennial, it is coasting North Carolina millions of dollars in efforts to control it.
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Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue , Winter 2011, p22-24, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
25939
Abstract:
The presence of aquatic weed in northeastern North Carolina has brought concern about control of its growth. Although some argue that the growth of watermilfoil is beneficial to sport fishing, others argue that it pushes out native species on which ducks and geese feed. Either way, as a part of the food chain, it requires some form of management. Researchers are working with different methods of control using a combination of changes in water level, light penetration, and nutrient loading.
Source:
Friend O’ Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 16 Issue 4, Fall 1973, p4-5
Record #:
6671
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Alligator weed is an exotic plant that is getting a chokehold on the state's waterways. It is harmless looking with a hollow stem and opposite dark green leaves. However, it provides a breeding place for mosquitoes, plugs ditches and creeks, impedes drainage and navigation, destroys wildlife habitat, and poses a threat to agriculture. Wilson discusses what is being done to control this invasive plant. The article includes a map locating the state's known alligator weed infestations.
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Record #:
6683
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Alligator weed is an exotic plant that is getting a chokehold on the state's waterways. On July 3, 1958, Congress passed a law that “authorized a comprehensive project to provide for the control and progressive eradication of the water hyacinth, alligator weed, and other obnoxious aquatic plant growths.” In 1960, North Carolina began a project to combat these plants. Johnson summarizes the project objectives, control operations performed, and results observed to date in the state.
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Record #:
6074
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Hydrilla, a green plant native to Africa, has been found in the state's waterways, including lakes in Raleigh's Umstead Park and in Wake County. The plant forms dense mats on the water that prevent fishing and boating and that offer fertile mosquito breeding grounds. It is a difficult plant to control.
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Record #:
4584
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Giant salvinia, a highly invasive aquatic weed, has been found in nine eastern counties. Federal law prohibits sale of the plant, but it has been discovered at nurseries and water gardens. The plant can double in size in a few days. It can overrun coastal swamps and freshwater wetlands, choking native vegetation with a mat that be two feet thick and depleting water of oxygen.
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Record #:
6015
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Hydrilla and alligator weed are two exotic plants that are getting a chokehold on the state's waterways. Hydrilla forms dense mats on waterways that prevent fishing and boating. Alligator weed functions in the same manner, but it can also establish itself on land with devastating effect. Ashley discusses what is being done to control these invasive plants.
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Record #:
33296
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The North Carolina Wildlife Commission permitted the stocking of sterile triploid grass carp at more than fifty locations in twenty-seven counties in North Carolina in 1985. Most stockings were in private ponds and lakes infested with a variety of submerged and floating aquatic weeds. The largest single stocking was with five-thousand fish in Sutton Lake near Wilmington.
Record #:
33349
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Alligatorweed is a nuisance aquatic weed that can infest North Carolina waterways when left unmanaged. In 1983 the North Carolina Agricultural Extension Service developed a management program utilizing new herbicide technology.
Record #:
33405
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Although several noxious aquatics are being considered for inclusion in North Carolina’s Aquatic Weed Control Program, all control efforts to date have focused on hydrilla and alligator-weed. This article discusses the distribution of infestation and where control efforts have been effective.
Record #:
34031
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The control of undesirable aquatic weeds in drainage canals, rivers, and lakes in North Carolina continues to be of concern to water managers. Surveys conducted last summer and fall by the Division of Water Resources determined that at least thirty-six counties are infested with hydrilla and alligator weed.
Record #:
34297
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Giant Salvinia (Salvinia molesta) is a new invasive aquatic weed that has turned up in botanical gardens and ponds in eastern North Carolina counties, and has been traced to aquatic nurseries and dealers. Native to South America, giant salvinia is a floating fern that can double its biomass in about two days. The North Carolina Department of Agricultural and Consumer Services’ Plant Protection Division is working with dealers and nurseries to prevent the establishment of giant salvinia in natural waters.