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10 results for Vanderbilt, George Washington II, 1862-1914
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Record #:
8430
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George Vanderbilt had a curiosity about nature, and he financially supported extensive botanical activities at his Biltmore estate near Asheville. Five individuals were involved in the botanical work: Chauncy Delos Beadle, Frank Ellis Boynton, Francis Marian Crayton, Charles Lawrence Boynton, and Thomas Grant Harbison. The estate had widespread plant collections, a large herbarium, and a journal, Biltmore Botanical Studies. The botanical work was discontinued after a few years, but it made a significant contribution to the knowledge of the flora of the southeastern United States.
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Record #:
13853
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Modeled after a French Renaissance castle, the Biltmore Estate, located in Asheville, North Carolina, is considered to be one of the finest homes in America. Commissioned by George Vanderbilt in 1887, the house was completed and opened by Christmas Day, 1895. Draughn focuses on the worldly and historic décor and possessions throughout the house, the majority of which were attained by Vanderbilt during travels overseas.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 20 Issue 44, Apr 1953, p4-5, 13, il
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Record #:
14133
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In 1888, George Washington Vanderbilt II traveled through western North Carolina, where he discovered the land of his dreams. There he would build the finest country home, forest, garden, and farm in America. To aid him he called upon the best architect, landscape gardener, and forester that could be found in the United States -- Hunt, Olmsted, and Pinchot, each a pioneer in his field.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 17 Issue 17, Sept 1949, p8-9, f
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Record #:
15172
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John W. Squires reported an increase of nabbing poachers in Pisgah National Forest. Poachers used spotlights to blind and confuse wildlife then proceed to hunt. One species in danger was the Virginia white-tail deer, an animal stocked by George W. Vanderbilt around his Biltmore Estate and later partially incorporated into Pisgah National Forest. Numbers of poachers apprehended from November 1937 to May 1, 1938 totaled twenty in the Pisgah Game Preserve and an additional twenty-two in Sherwood State Refuge. The solution was to place additional wardens armed with flashlights and revolvers at strategic points throughout the preserve.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 6 Issue 1, June 1938, p1, 18, il
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Record #:
20173
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Pioneers in the management of American forestry got their start in western North Carolina in the late 1800s. With George Vanderbilt's backing, Carl Alwin Schenck faced the monumental challenge of managing thousands of acres of eroding forestland; together they developed the first map in the US for the purpose of large-scale forest management and established the Biltmore Forest School, the first forestry school in America.
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Record #:
16188
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Western forests were stripped in the 19th-century, but with investment of time and money George Vanderbilt helped to restore the region's natural resources. The region was first to hire an American forester, Gifford Pinchot, establish an American College of Forestry with Dr. Carl Alwin Schenck as head, and create a national forest in eastern America.
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Record #:
28540
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The Young Men’s Institute Band of Asheville and their history is detailed. Started by George Vanderbilt in 1893, the YMI served African American men and boys who helped construct the Biltmore Estate. The instrumental makeup of the band, their performances, their style of music, and their place in American music history are detailed.
Record #:
29595
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The Last Castle is Denise Kiernan’s new nonfiction book about the Vanderbilt legacy, the Biltmore House and its surrounding estate. The book also tracts Asheville’s transformation and economic boom.
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Record #:
29728
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The artistry of great literary works, costume design and movie making comes together in Designed for Drama: Fashion from the Classics, a new exhibition premiering in Biltmore House. Inspired by George Vanderbilt’s love of literature, the exhibition showcases award-winning costumes from films based on favorite books in his collection. Vanderbilt amassed a library of more than twenty-thousand volumes at his North Carolina home.
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