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9 results for Landfills
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Record #:
16906
Author(s):
Abstract:
In this second in a series examining the state's trash, Ney discusses the problem with plastic bags. First introduced in grocery stores in the 1970s, now 90 percent of the shopping bags used worldwide are plastic and less than five percent are returned for recycling. Those thrown away endanger wildlife, emit toxic fumes if burned, contaminate soil, and pollute waterways. Ney discusses possible solutions.
Source:
Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 44 Issue 7, July 2012, p20, il
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Record #:
16904
Author(s):
Abstract:
Ney begins a new series on waste that will examine some of the common items that are environmentally harmful, but are still tossed into landfills, and what can be done about them. North Carolinians throw away nine times more than they recycle. Ney discusses reasons why paper should be recycled.
Source:
Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 44 Issue 6, June 2012, p24, il
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Record #:
20551
Abstract:
This bulletin reviews solid-waste management legislation enacted by the 1994 NC General Assembly. Among the new legislation were laws governing local government review of landfill applications and landfills for on-site disposal of land clearing debris.
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Record #:
22032
Abstract:
In 1991, the Environmental Protection Agency issued strict regulations concerning the design, location, operation, and closing of municipal solid waste landfills; and requiring that landfill sites be monitored for thirty years after their closing. The bulletin discusses estimating the costs of closure and post-closure care, analyzes the six mechanisms an operator may use to provide financial assurance for those costs, analyzes the probable impact of the financial assurance regulations on North Carolina local government operators of municipal solid waste landfills, and discusses the strengths and weaknesses of the various mechanisms.
Source:
Local Finance Bulletin (NoCar KFN 7888 .L62), Vol. Issue 30, 1994, p1-9
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Record #:
25182
Author(s):
Abstract:
Several old landfill sites in Beaufort County have been found to be leaking dangerous chemicals into the groundwater. So far the drinking water for residents seems to be untouched.
Source:
Currents (NoCar TD 171.3 P3 P35x), Vol. 10 Issue 1, Fall 1990, p4
Record #:
31075
Author(s):
Abstract:
Trash emits enough methane gas to generate electricity that can supply more than six-hundred average North Carolina houses every day. While North Carolina produces more than ten-million tons of trash in landfills per year, the state is investing in landfill gas production and other renewable energy projects.
Source:
Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 38 Issue 11, Nov 2006, p8, il
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Record #:
31690
Author(s):
Abstract:
Despite laws against dumping and littering, the North Carolina countryside is being polluted by a proliferation of trash. In many cases, the trash dumps exist because there is no provision in the community for garbage and trash collection and nowhere else to dispose of it. This article discusses the problem and efforts to build sanitary landfills.
Source:
Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 5 Issue 7, July 1973, p4-5, il, por
Record #:
33197
Author(s):
Abstract:
With landfills in North Carolina counties filling up fast, officials are looking to alternative methods of waste disposal. Mecklenburg County is investigating waste-to-energy plants that would take garbage and burn it to produce steam and electricity or ferment it to produce ethanol, a gasoline additive.
Record #:
34224
Author(s):
Abstract:
On June 30, the North Carolina Commission for Health Services adopted amendments to the state’s Solid Waste Management Rules. Changes were needed for North Carolina to be approved by the Environmental Protection Agency to implement its own solid waste management program. There are significant changes for local governments that operate landfills that receive household and other types of non-hazardous solid waste.