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11 results for Fishing--Records
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Record #:
14733
Abstract:
More than 200,000 pounds of fish were caught in a single net off Bogue Banks - the greatest catch in the history of fishing off the North Carolina coast.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 12 Issue 23, Nov 1944, p1-4, 22, f
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Record #:
17338
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Abstract:
J. Grayson Neal is a hosiery manufacturer in Marion. In the winter Neal goes to Florida to compete in fishing tournaments, such as the International Tarpon Tournament, where he took first prize in 1935. He holds a number of records and recently caught a 521-pound sea bass with a rod-and-reel. It is the largest sea bass ever caught with that type of equipment.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 7 Issue 9, July 1939, p7, il
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Record #:
8320
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The State Travel and Promotion Division is the official record-keeper for North Carolina's game fish catches. The division requests that it be notified when a caught fish might be a state record. Records are kept in two categories -– freshwater and saltwater. Arrington provides lists from both categories, giving the species, weight, location caught, lure or bait, date of catch, and the name of the angler.
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Record #:
9077
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The North Carolina Travel and Promotion Division maintains a freshwater record list and a saltwater record list for fish caught in the state's waters. The article discusses requirements for getting a fish recognized as a record. Information on records catches through March 1974 include species, weight, location caught, lure or bait used, date caught, and the angler.
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Record #:
9634
Abstract:
North Carolina's records for freshwater fish are listed along with photographs of and comments by the fishermen who caught them.
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Record #:
9779
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For the past thirty-five years, fishing records for saltwater and freshwater fish have been kept. Arrington provides information on the latest records and how to apply for a record. The species, weight, location of the catch, date of the catch, and the name of the angler are included in the records.
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Record #:
3968
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Abstract:
When Robert Lee Dyer of Sylva caught a twenty-four pound, ten-ounce brown trout in the Nantahala River on April 17, 1998, he bettered the existing state record by nine pounds.
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Record #:
7196
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Abstract:
Of North Carolina's forty freshwater fishing records, ten were set over twenty-five years ago. These include the bluegill at four pounds, five ounces; American (white) shad at seven pounds, fifteen and one-half ounces; and the channel catfish at forty pounds, eight ounces. Scott Van Horn, head of the North Carolina Division of Inland Fisheries' Habitat Conservation Program, discusses why these forty records have stood the test of time.
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Record #:
11169
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Wilson recounts how Rocky Mount angler, E. J. Bowden, got his state record for catching a channel catfish returned after almost thirty-nine years. Bowden caught the channel catfish, which weighed twenty-three pounds and four ounces, in City Lake in Rocky Mount. However, through a mix-up, it was years before he got official recognition for the catch.
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Record #:
16907
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Abstract:
Seventeen-year-old Tyler Shields of Murphy is the new holder of the state record for striped bass. He landed the 66-pound fish March 31, 2012 at Hiawassee. The fish exceeded the old freshwater record by twelve pounds and the state saltwater record by two pounds.
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Record #:
26831
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Abstract:
Raymond T. Sides of Salisbury caught a large blue catfish in the Falls Reservoir near Badin, North Carolina. The fish weight forty-nine pounds and is expected to establish a state record. The blue catfish is a stranger to the Yadkin River basin, and is a native of the Mississippi River Valley.
Source:
Friend O’ Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 28 Issue 7, July 1981, p13, por