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13 results for Culture--Southern
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Record #:
19570
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In this re-printing of his December 4, 1924 address before the State Literary and Historical Association, Jackson discusses a criticism of the post-confederate American south by essayist H.L. Mencken in which the region is described as completely lacking in culture and civilization.
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Record #:
21816
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This article examines the relationship between Confederate identity and conceptions of Christianity, manhood, patriotism, and class in the antebellum South through the wartime diary of North Carolina lawyer and Confederate bureaucrat David Schenck.
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Record #:
23109
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In the nineteenth and early-twentieth century, southerners frequented front porches during the hot summer months and used the space as social centers. With the invention of the air conditioner, this culture changed dramatically, but memories of this history remain.
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Greenville: Life in the East (NoCar F264 G8 G743), Vol. Issue , Summer 2015, p21-23, il
Record #:
26180
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Glenn Hinson, associate professor of anthropology, says the romantic image of the old South is based on historical myth and overlooks broader trends. Southern society is defined by a black and white dichotomy, but in reality, the South is shaped by a highly diverse creole culture.
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Endeavors (NoCar LD 3941.3 A3), Vol. 13 Issue 3, Spring 1997, p6-11, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
27578
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As the Triangle area and the South culture changes, funerals and funeral culture has stayed the same. The types of funerals people attend are categorized using the books of famous Southern authors. William Faulkner’s, Mark Twain’s, Reynolds Price’s, and Eudora Welty’s stories about funerals are used to determine whether a funeral will be about the motivations of relatives of the deceased, intense emotions of happiness, sadness, or humor, or exaggerations of the deceased’s life, personality, and accomplishments.
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Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 7 Issue 41, December 14-20 1989, p9-11 Periodical Website
Record #:
27619
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The Southern Folklife Collection at UNC-Chapel Hill’s Wilson Library is the home to a collection of music, writing, artifacts, and other folk art. The collection portrays a picture of the complex cultural factors in the South. The collection features over 300,000 items and is the archive is open to the public. Some of the more unique pieces are discussed.
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Record #:
27947
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The history of when pimento cheese first appeared, its popularity in North Carolina and the south, and its cultural importance are explored. The Triangle area with Charlotte is the biggest market in the nation for pimento cheese. Ruth’s Salads of Charlotte is the top producer of the cheese in the nation. Pimento cheese gained popularity due to the fact it was cheap to make, tasted good, and convenient to take to work.
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Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 27 Issue 21, May 2010, p21 Periodical Website
Record #:
37008
Abstract:
For Kelly, the difference between supper and dinner is the food on the plate and the occasion being formal or informal. With those distinctions in mind, the author suggests that, since the South is a casual region, the evening meal should be called supper and never with a capital S.
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Record #:
35832
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Starting as an anthropological study in northeastern North Carolina, the author learns about the techniques used in making and using duck decoys, as duck hunting is a large part of society. The decoys work no matter how crudely they are made, but the carvings and designs on it are symbolic of social status.
Record #:
36574
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Church picnics on the grounds meant the occasion took place in its churchyard or cemetery. As for the day designated, sometimes it was Decoration Day, at other times a cemetery cleanup or homecoming. No matter the day or occasion, it always involved traditional Appalachian dishes, illustrated in the accompanying photo. The author noted recipes such as dried green beans cooked with fatback called “leather britches” and stack cake made with alternating layers of cake and dried fruit.
Record #:
35758
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The fourth annual symposium of the Southern Foodways Alliance continued the trend of valuing traditions associated with Southern cooking culture and the region’s farming industry. Discussed during this symposium was challenges that contemporary regional farmers face, due to the USDA’s implementing the corporate farm mentality. Also highlighted was challenges of maintaining Southern cooking cultural traditions, with an increasingly diverse and transient regional population.
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Record #:
36209
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The author asserted the appeal of collards, a mainstay in Southern lifeways. To assure a successful yield, she offered optimal growing conditions and ways to treat diseases such as damping off. As for yielding a successful meal, she recommended how to properly prepare and store collards.
Record #:
39920
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The setting in Shelia Turnage’s novels proves that facts from a writer’s life always find their way into his or her fiction. Tupelo’s Landing resembles the town where Turnage lives and any small town in the South. Evidence includes a list of lines quoted from her Dale and Mo mystery series.
Source:
Greenville: Life in the East (NoCar F264 G8 G743), Vol. Issue , Fall 2015 , p50-52, 54