NCPI Workmark
Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

Search Results


7 results for Collards
Currently viewing results 1 - 7
PAGE OF 1
Record #:
8113
Author(s):
Abstract:
In this ongoing series about favorite Southern dishes, Garner discusses the delights of collard greens, their history, and how to prepare and serve them. He lists several eating establishments that serve good collard greens: Bum's Restaurant (Ayden); The Coffee Cup (Charlotte); and Bo's Café (Kenansville).
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 74 Issue 5, Oct 2006, p36-38, 40, 42, 44-45, il Periodical Website
Subject(s):
Full Text:
Record #:
9172
Author(s):
Abstract:
Collards became a staple in the south because it is one of the few vegetables that can survive the cold winters. Some people cook the entire plants and some only the leaves, but mostly they are boiled. Collards received national recognition in 1975 when Ayden held their first annual Collard Festival.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 44 Issue 8, Jan 1977, p21-22, il
Subject(s):
Full Text:
Record #:
16532
Author(s):
Abstract:
Collards have been maligned over the years. This staple of Down East and the rural South since the memory of man has been ridiculed and relegated to the status of lowly side dish. At the same time, people of the rural South have held collards in high esteem due to their hearty character, nutritional value, and taste. However, in the new Southern cuisine they are raised to an iconic level becoming the center of gourmet dishes.
Source:
Subject(s):
Full Text:
Record #:
24756
Author(s):
Abstract:
Collards are a popular southern dish and have risen in popularity more recently. Kinston chef Vivian Howard and North Carolina farmers Lloyd Lewis, Howard McAdams, and Louis Nixon discuss their cooking and farming experience with collards in North Carolina.
Source:
North Carolina Field and Family (NoCar S 1 N672), Vol. 2 Issue 4, Winter 2015, p6-9, il, por, map
Full Text:
Record #:
22604
Abstract:
The collard sandwich is made of fried cornbread patties, homemade chow chow, and a scoop of cooked collard greens. This unique sandwich is just beginning to gain popularity outside of Robeson County, North Carolina where it was traditionally prepared as a Lumbee Indian dish.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 82 Issue 9, February 2015, p136-138, 140, 142, por Periodical Website
Record #:
31256
Author(s):
Abstract:
Collards are immensely popular in the South, particularly in the fall and early winter. Sampson County is the largest commercial producer of collards. Benny Cox, also known as the Collard Queen, discusses the collards industry and various heirloom varieties.
Source:
Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 32 Issue 12, Dec 2000, p10-11, il
Subject(s):
Record #:
36209
Author(s):
Abstract:
The author asserted the appeal of collards, a mainstay in Southern lifeways. To assure a successful yield, she offered optimal growing conditions and ways to treat diseases such as damping off. As for yielding a successful meal, she recommended how to properly prepare and store collards.