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3 results for Decoration Day
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Record #:
20932
Author(s):
Abstract:
With the completion of Fontana Dam, a number of families were removed in 1943 from the part of the lake that came to be known as the North Shore. Part of their folk tradition was Decoration Day, or cleaning and decorating graves of family or soldiers. The people were promised an access road to the twenty-seven cemeteries after the war, and several sections were built. In the 1960s construction ceased. Jabbour recounts the work of Helen Cable Vance, her sister Mildred Cable Johnson, and the North Shore Historical Association in leading the movement to make access to the graves a reality.
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Record #:
36889
Abstract:
Visiting several cemeteries in Jackson County’s Canada Township, the author happened across a cemetery style that he had not seen before, found in three different cemeteries. The style was a bare earth mound, meaning the graves were mounded up and kept clear of grass and weeds, and then covered with a thick layer of white gravel to maintain the shape and suppress growth of grass.
Record #:
36574
Author(s):
Abstract:
Church picnics on the grounds meant the occasion took place in its churchyard or cemetery. As for the day designated, sometimes it was Decoration Day, at other times a cemetery cleanup or homecoming. No matter the day or occasion, it always involved traditional Appalachian dishes, illustrated in the accompanying photo. The author noted recipes such as dried green beans cooked with fatback called “leather britches” and stack cake made with alternating layers of cake and dried fruit.