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10 results for Segregation
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Record #:
10292
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The article discusses the effect a ruling by the United States Supreme Court to support or to strike down school segregation would have on North Carolina, which maintains separate but equal public schools.
Record #:
12721
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John Wheeler, a prominent banker in Durham, commented that Negroes should be given more opportunity for industrial training. Author Jesse Helms sympathizes with Wheeler, but takes exception with his determined support of federal legislation requiring employers to hire job applicants based on race rather than experience. Segregation is at the core of Helms' article, as he points out that many people rallying against such treatment are in fact perpetrating its continuation.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 29 Issue 12, Nov 1961, p26
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Record #:
22784
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Part 10 of the Story of Charlotte series, \"Fights for Independence,\" covers 1940s through early 1960s Charlotte. The attack on Pearl Harbor and the United States' entrance into World War II took many Mecklenburg County men overseas, but women--both white and black--could work in local factories for equal pay. Following the war, racial tensions heightened and the Civil Rights Movement emerged as local leaders like Harry Golden and Reginald Hawkins advocated for integration in recreational areas, restaurants, and schools.
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Record #:
25504
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During World War 11, Camp Montford Point in Jacksonville served as the segregated training camp for the first African-American Marines. The Marine Corps was the last branch of the military to accept African-Americans. The Montford Camp Marines broke down racial barriers for future African-American recruits.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 83 Issue 6, November 2015, p32-35, il, por, map Periodical Website
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Record #:
25578
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Rocky Mount native Walter “Buck” Leonard played for the Negro National League during the time when blacks were not welcomed in the big leagues. He spent his career in Pittsburgh with the Homestead Grays, winning nine straight pennants from 1937-45. In 1972, he was inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame.
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Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 1 Issue 3, May 13-26 1983, p9, por Periodical Website
Record #:
7079
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The Jim Crow laws were legislative acts passed by Southern state legislatures to separate citizens by race or color. Wadelington discusses areas in North Carolina society affected by these laws, including education, restaurants, and hospitals.
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Record #:
27895
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Wake County’s school system no longer has a diversity policy. Now, the challenge is to assign Wake County’s students to specific schools by re-drawing lines. If all students went to their local neighborhood schools, the schools would be over-crowded. Some are afraid that the school system will have the same problems Charlotte had when they got rid of their diversity plan. Some fear Wake County schools will become re-segregated and minorities and low-income students will suffer the most.
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Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 27 Issue 13, March 2010, p11-12 Periodical Website
Record #:
34451
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Many of North Carolina’s 4-H programs remained racially segregated through the 1980s despite open membership policies and legislation. This article addresses four aspects of 4-H and race—organizational inequalities, white support of black members, black activism and advocacy, and eventual racial integration of 4-H clubs.
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Record #:
34987
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From May 15, 2015 to February 19, 2017 at the Cape Fear Museum, an exhibition called “Reflections in Black and White” will be available to view. The photographs, all black and white photos, were taken in Wilmington in the 1940s and 50’s. While the subjects are doing similar things, like attending parties, playing, or working, they all showcase the significant amount of segregation at the time; not one photograph has a white and black subject in the same frame.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 84 Issue 8, January 2017, p94-98, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
40876
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Included in Bobby Daniels and Michael Garrett’s recollections are their first day at Greenville's JH Rose High School, factors that made their adjustments possible, and challenges part of the transition of Pitt County public schools from segregated to integrated.
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