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5 results for Wilmington--Race relations
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Record #:
1503
Abstract:
Steelman recounts the story of the 1898 Wilmington race riot, including a sketch of the history of prior race relations in the city and a discussion of the story's tangled historiography.
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Record #:
7284
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Abstract:
On April 2, 2005, Lethia Hankins, a member of the Wilmington City Council, received the 2005 Dorothy Height Racial Justice Award. She was honored for her work in easing racial tensions in southeastern North Carolina during her thirty-five-year teaching career with the New Hanover County Schools. Previous award winners include former President William Jefferson Clinton.
Source:
Southern City (NoCar Oversize JS 39 S6), Vol. 55 Issue 6, June 2005, p3, il, por
Record #:
21116
Abstract:
The 1898 Wilmington Race Riot, a low point in African-Americans' treatment after the Civil War, is generally recognized as the onset of the Jim Crow era in North Carolina. This narrative conveys the events leading up to, during, and after the riots.
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Record #:
34644
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Abstract:
At the beginning of World War II, Arthur Miller, before he became a world-renowned playwright, recorded interviews with civilians in North Carolina. Outside of Wilmington, he discussed the impacts on the shipping industry, African-American workers and strikes, and wartime attitudes against fascism. The interviews comment on the industry and population boom brought in by the wartime effort, as well as lament the loss of small-town life and cultural changes.
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North Carolina Literary Review (NoCar PS 266 N8 N66x), Vol. 23 Issue 1, 2014, p48-59, il, por, f Periodical Website
Record #:
34987
Author(s):
Abstract:
From May 15, 2015 to February 19, 2017 at the Cape Fear Museum, an exhibition called “Reflections in Black and White” will be available to view. The photographs, all black and white photos, were taken in Wilmington in the 1940s and 50’s. While the subjects are doing similar things, like attending parties, playing, or working, they all showcase the significant amount of segregation at the time; not one photograph has a white and black subject in the same frame.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 84 Issue 8, January 2017, p94-98, il, por Periodical Website
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