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12 results for Onslow County--History
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Record #:
14113
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Abstract:
Of all North Carolina's one hundred courthouses, few have had as exciting a history as Onslow County's second seat of justice. Six courthouses were built before one would stay put.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 17 Issue 10, Aug 1949, p10
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Record #:
14947
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Once there was a quiet, peaceful, slow-moving county in eastern North Carolina on the Atlantic Ocean, known as Onslow County. The people farmed and fished and took life easily. But today Onslow is a modern, bustling, wide-awake section of North Carolina thanks to Camp Davis and two marine bases.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 10 Issue 16, Sept 1942, p1-2, 17, f
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Record #:
19578
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William Borden was a shipbuilder from Rhode Island who relocated to Carteret County where he established a shipbuilding business on the Newport River. His \"Address to the Inhabitants of North Carolina,\" addresses issues of commercial conditions and trade and monetary policies in the colony. It includes a plan for sound currency and a criticism of the Assembly of 1744.
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Record #:
24441
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This article discusses the history of John Murrell, a man from Onslow County who some described as a ‘horse thief gone murderer.’ The author describes how he tracked down and revealed more of the ‘bad man of the West’s’ history.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 58 Issue 10, March 1991, p15-17
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Record #:
24685
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Onslow County was originally a small farming and fishing-based region, but after 1940, when development of an anti-aircraft base began, the county was pushed into the mainstream and grew exponentially. The history of development and growth in the region is provided here.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 22 Issue 22, March 1955, p18-26, il, por, map
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Record #:
24684
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An anecdotal history of Onslow is provided, with a particular focus on the early 1900s.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 22 Issue 22, March 1955, p16-17, il, por
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Record #:
25504
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During World War 11, Camp Montford Point in Jacksonville served as the segregated training camp for the first African-American Marines. The Marine Corps was the last branch of the military to accept African-Americans. The Montford Camp Marines broke down racial barriers for future African-American recruits.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 83 Issue 6, November 2015, p32-35, il, por, map Periodical Website
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Record #:
16207
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The 1752 hurricane hit Onslow County's barrier islands and destroyed the New River Inlet, crops, timber and livestock. Equally devastating was complete destruction of the courthouse and all public records. The General Assembly approved construction of a new courthouse further inland than Johnston at Wantland's Ferry, later known as Snead's Ferry.
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Record #:
34636
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This article addresses excerpts of an oral history with Issac Taylor taken in 1937. At the time, Taylor was the last living soldier in Onslow County. Taylor recalls being brought up by a slave after his mother left. During his childhood, Taylor attended school while working on his family farm. In 1862, Taylor volunteered for the Confederacy and enlisted with the 19th Regiment. Taylor fought at the battles of New Bern and Gettysburg. Taylor was captured in April 1865 and spent three months in a prisoner of war camp. Following the war, Taylor returned to Onslow County and started a family.
Source:
The Researcher (NoCar F 262 C23 R47), Vol. 16 Issue 3, Winter 2000, p22-28, il, por
Record #:
36971
Abstract:
Morton Academy, a schoolhouse slated for demolition, can educate generations to come about the school experience of yesteryear, thanks to the efforts of two locals. Hints of what this experience was like was offered in this article through information about the typical 19th century schoolhouse and Onslow County schoolhouses in the early 20th century.
Record #:
38092
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Brompton Plantation was the home of Gov. Gabriel Johnston.
Record #:
38251
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Camp Lejeune, cited as contributing three million dollars annually to North Carolina’s economy, makes a contribution whose measure is defined in the word hero. Accompanying are photographs showing these heroes preparing for combat. Attesting to aspects of their identity not defined by uniform or rank are pictures of Marines off base relaxing or reuniting with family.
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