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14 results for North Carolina--History--Civil War, 1861-1865--Personal narratives, Confederate
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Record #:
4481
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James Carthine English was born in McDowell County in 1838. In 1862, he joined the Confederate Army and went off to fight in North Carolina and Virginia. On May 16th, 1864, he was mortally wounded near Richmond. He wrote his family over 150 letters which were preserved and handed down through the generations, a cherished legacy of a devoted husband and father.
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Record #:
5712
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Like many Civil War soldiers who wrote home, General William D. Pender composed a number of letters to his wife, Fanny, up to the time of his death from wounds received at Gettysburg. A representative selection is included.
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Record #:
8109
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In November 1864, Lieutenant Edward J. Bowen, of Company K, 31st North Carolina Infantry Regiment, wrote home to his friend Benjamin F. Brinson, pleading for help in getting his mother food and other items. Brinson includes a copy of the handwritten letter and its transcription and information on the two men.
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Record #:
9951
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In the summer of 1865, James Ellis Malone was thirteen years old and living in the Yankee occupied Franklin County town of Louisburg. He recorded his recollections in a journal that was handed down to his grandson, Edward L. Best. Excerpts quoted directly from the journal make up the bulk of the article, and include references to General J. E. B. Stuart, the 1st N.C. Cavalry, and Union Generals William T. Sherman and Oliver O. Howard.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 40 Issue 17, Mar 1973, p18-20, 27, il, por
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Record #:
17531
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Betts graduated from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill in 1855. He converted to Methodism while there and was later licensed to preach. During the Civil War he served four years as chaplain of the 30th N.C. Regiment and kept a journal. After the war, he published it as EXPERIENCES OF A CONFEDERATE CHAPLAIN.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 7 Issue 22, Oct 1939, p9-10, por
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Record #:
19533
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Jacob Nathaniel Raymer was a Catawba County native who joined Company C of the 4th North Carolina Infantry when the state seceded from the Union on June 7, 1861. An observant individual and insatiable writer, Raymer sends detailed letters home to his local newspaper throughout the war making him one of hundreds of war correspondents. The article reviews the role of these war correspondents for both sides and how news was disseminated during the Civil War.
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Record #:
19709
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This piece reprints a series of letters written by Lt. Thomas Jackson Strayhorn, a Hillsboro native. The letters were written between July 1863 through December 1868 by Strayhorn to various family members and offers insight into the daily life of a Confederate soldier.
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Record #:
20024
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The Vinson family lived on a farm near Wayne County Poor House prior to the Civil War and consisted of father Thomas Robert, mother Martha Fletcher, daughters Rachel and Mary, and sons Uriah, Daniel, and Benjamin. The three boys joined the Confederate ranks and wrote to their families during their time as soldiers. These letters are reprinted here and offer insight into the life of the common soldier.
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Record #:
20824
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This is a reprint of diary entries and letters written by Confederate soldier Leonidas Torrence during his service with the \"Gaston Guards,\" Company H, Thirteenth North Carolina Regiment. Most notably, Torrence writes during his march north towards Gettysburg, recording his battle experiences through July 4th, when he was fatally wounded. Also included are letters from W.J. O'Daniel to Torrence's mother informing her first of her son being wounded in action, and then informing her and providing details of his death.
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Record #:
4525
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John Futch, New Hanover county farmer, husband, and father, joined the Confederate Army in February 1862. He fought at Chancellorsville and Gettysburg, where his brother Charley was killed. Futch wrote a number of letters to his wife describing his hardships, weakness in spirit after the Gettysburg defeat and Charley's death, and his wanting to come home. Futch was shot for desertion on September 3, 1863.
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Record #:
4524
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North Carolina gave over 125,000 troops to the Confederate Army. Almost 20,000 were killed, and another 20,000 died of disease. Thousands more suffered crippling wounds. The harsh life of a soldier is revealed through letters of Jeremiah Glover, Rowan County; Bryan Grimes, Pitt County; and Samuel H. Walkup, Union County.
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Tar Heel Junior Historian (NoCar F 251 T3x), Vol. 26 Issue 2, Spring 1987, p10-16, il, por
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Record #:
28632
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James Ryder Randall was secretary to Flag Officer William F. Lynch, commanding the Naval Defenses of North Carolina in 1863. He wrote daily letters to Kate S. Hammond, daughter of General M.C.M. Hammond of Burnside, describing his river excursions to Fort Fisher and Smithville. His letters provide a vivid picture of the estuary of the Cape Fear River in 1864.
Record #:
34636
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This article addresses excerpts of an oral history with Issac Taylor taken in 1937. At the time, Taylor was the last living soldier in Onslow County. Taylor recalls being brought up by a slave after his mother left. During his childhood, Taylor attended school while working on his family farm. In 1862, Taylor volunteered for the Confederacy and enlisted with the 19th Regiment. Taylor fought at the battles of New Bern and Gettysburg. Taylor was captured in April 1865 and spent three months in a prisoner of war camp. Following the war, Taylor returned to Onslow County and started a family.
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The Researcher (NoCar F 262 C23 R47), Vol. 16 Issue 3, Winter 2000, p22-28, il, por
Record #:
37392
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Article from 1961 about Alonza Etheridge Bell and the diary he kept after being captured at Hatteras Island. A list is given of autographs of officers that were captured at Hatteras Island.