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13 results for Education--Curricula
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Record #:
1957
Abstract:
One element of the school reform movement is the integrated curriculum. Instead of teaching visual arts in isolation, instructors combine them with other core subjects, such as science and humanities, to facilitate holistic learning.
Source:
North Carolina Journal of Teacher Education (NoCar LB 1725 N8 N66x), Vol. 7 Issue 1, Summer 1994, p29-Dec, il, bibl
Record #:
14787
Author(s):
Abstract:
Wilson County schools underwent changes after Superintendent K. R. Curtis took over in 1943. He introduced programs to aid families during war time constraints, this included education for children and parents alike. Farmers could go to classes a few days a week to learn vocational skills to better maintain and repair farm equipment during a time when such machinery was scarce. Teachers, in cooperation with parents, assigned advanced school work to students that may need to stay home and assist with farming during the school year. Curtis further emphasized agriculture by demanding agricultural vocation programs in 100% of Wilson County schools.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 11 Issue 3, June 1943, p4-5, 24
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Record #:
24035
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Abstract:
Muddy Sneakers is a non-profit organization that takes fifth grade students on trips to the mountains as part of their science curriculum. Unifying classroom learning with hands-on experience helps the children grasp concepts more effectively.
Record #:
24034
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Rainbow Mountain's Children's School has a 35-year history in West Asheville; the non-profit emphasizes delivering an academically challenging curriculum in a holistic way that integrates spiritual practice, the arts, and service.
Record #:
29713
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Abstract:
Arthur Morgan School is a nonprofit boarding and day school in the Celo community near Burnsville, North Carolina. This school uses a different approach to learning, one that is based on Montessori and Quaker values such as simple living and consensual decision making. The result is a progressive farm school where students live, work, create and learn together.
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Record #:
29748
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In Western North Carolina, Hendersonville’s Balfour Education Center is a non-traditional high school that offers classes in business, criminal justice, firefighting, and mechatronics. The school’s Art Academy offers four levels of art instruction, and provides students with the opportunity to participate in community projects and art shows.
Record #:
30383
Author(s):
Abstract:
Financial literacy education is starting to become a better-known topic within our North Carolina public school systems. A few bills have been passed requiring education curriculum to incorporate general economics, money management, savings and investment, and general banking procedures. With better financial management skills, there may be fewer bankruptcies and foreclosures, and lower consumer debt.
Source:
Carolina Banker (HG 2153 N8 C66), Vol. 91 Issue 4, Winter 2012, p54-55, il
Record #:
30815
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French Broad EMC, an electric cooperative serving four western North Carolina counties and two in Tennessee, is a partner in the first rural wind power education program east of the Mississippi River. The project will install small wind turbines at three schools in Madison County and develop an alternative-energy curriculum for public schools as part of an effort to introduce wind power to rural communities.
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Record #:
31218
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Abstract:
Aquaculture programs are appearing throughout eastern North Carolina, where fish farmers grow everything from catfish, hybrid striped bass and tilapia in ponds and tanks, to clams and oysters offshore. High schools are integrating aquaculture into the curriculum to teach students about this growing sector of agriculture. Students learn how to build and maintain the culture system, while applying their skills in science and math.
Source:
Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 33 Issue 1, Jan 2001, p24-25, il, por Periodical Website
Record #:
32438
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Abstract:
During the 1975 session of the General Assembly, Cleveland County Senator William K. Mauney, Jr., initiated efforts to improve economic literacy. A proposed bill requires North Carolina public schools to teach free enterprise economics.
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Record #:
35781
Abstract:
By attempting to quell misconceptions about folklore, the authors hope to introduce the study of folklore into the classroom.
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Record #:
35782
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The author highlights the reasons and opportunities that can be provided by teaching folklore in the classroom.
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Record #:
36971
Abstract:
Morton Academy, a schoolhouse slated for demolition, can educate generations to come about the school experience of yesteryear, thanks to the efforts of two locals. Hints of what this experience was like was offered in this article through information about the typical 19th century schoolhouse and Onslow County schoolhouses in the early 20th century.