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15 results for North Carolina Journal of Teacher Education
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Record #:
91
Author(s):
Abstract:
Jenkins addresses North Carolina's teacher certification policy and offers some solutions to remedy existing problems.
Record #:
1111
Abstract:
The Professional Development Schools program at UNC-Greensboro is designed to allow pre-service teachers, classroom teachers, and university personnel to link theory and application and to reflect on their instructional practices and beliefs.
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Record #:
1113
Abstract:
A variety of programs at Elizabeth City State University are aimed at recruiting new minority teachers and teacher assistants. The programs are designed to address the serious decline in the number of black teachers.
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Record #:
1112
Abstract:
A reform effort undertaken at UNC-Chapel Hill by university and public school faculty creates a model of collaboration between public school and university educators in planning, implementing and evaluating teacher education.
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Record #:
1114
Author(s):
Abstract:
A study conducted at East Carolina University attempted to dispel the notion that individuals who enter the teaching profession are less academically competent than those entering other fields.
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Record #:
1950
Author(s):
Abstract:
The North Carolina Teaching Fellows Program is a way to recruit more teachers by offering high school graduates four-year scholarships in return for teaching four years in North Carolina public schools instead of repaying the loan.
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Record #:
1949
Abstract:
Project TEAM (Teaching Excellence Among Minorities) is a program used by Fayetteville State University and Pembroke State University to increase the number of minority teachers by recruiting and retaining minority students in teacher education.
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Record #:
1948
Author(s):
Abstract:
The minority teacher supply in the state has declined over the last ten years. To reverse this trend, Durham City Schools and North Carolina Central University began an exchange program to encourage minority and male students to choose teaching careers.
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Record #:
1957
Abstract:
One element of the school reform movement is the integrated curriculum. Instead of teaching visual arts in isolation, instructors combine them with other core subjects, such as science and humanities, to facilitate holistic learning.
Source:
North Carolina Journal of Teacher Education (NoCar LB 1725 N8 N66x), Vol. 7 Issue 1, Summer 1994, p29-Dec, il, bibl
Record #:
1958
Abstract:
Results of a survey of school principals in the state's Piedmont section indicate that they did not possess the necessary knowledge, skills, and competencies to administer programs in special education effectively.
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Record #:
1968
Author(s):
Abstract:
Teacher assistants and other paraprofessionals are a viable, but often overlooked, talent pool to reduce minority teacher shortages. Three N.C. teacher training schools have instituted a program to prepare teacher assistants for teaching certification.
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Record #:
1988
Abstract:
North Carolina's Basic Education Program requires that all students in grades K-5 study a foreign language and that teacher certification change to K-12 from 9-12. These requirements have implications for university foreign language training programs.
Source:
North Carolina Journal of Teacher Education (NoCar LB 1725 N8 N66x), Vol. 6 Issue 2, Fall 1993, p52-70, il, bibl
Record #:
1987
Abstract:
Results of a survey designed to test four hypotheses about attitudes of elementary education majors and non-education majors toward the subject areas of history, literature, math, reading, and science indicate differing attitudes between the two groups.
Source:
North Carolina Journal of Teacher Education (NoCar LB 1725 N8 N66x), Vol. 6 Issue 2, Fall 1993, p28-37, il, bibl
Subject(s):
Record #:
5602
Author(s):
Abstract:
Wake County opened the first year-round school in 1989. Nationally, the state ranks high in the number of these schools. The approach offers a variety of school calendars, better choice for parents, better school facility use, and overcrowding alleviation.
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