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11 results for Teachers--Supply and demand
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Record #:
1950
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The North Carolina Teaching Fellows Program is a way to recruit more teachers by offering high school graduates four-year scholarships in return for teaching four years in North Carolina public schools instead of repaying the loan.
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Record #:
1948
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The minority teacher supply in the state has declined over the last ten years. To reverse this trend, Durham City Schools and North Carolina Central University began an exchange program to encourage minority and male students to choose teaching careers.
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Record #:
3533
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The N.C. Teaching Fellows Program is marking its tenth anniversary. The program recruits top high school graduates for teaching programs and provides a $5,000 scholarship a year to qualifiers. To date, 1,290 fellows are teaching in 91 counties.
Source:
North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 55 Issue 11, Nov 1997, p50, il
Record #:
5405
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Carolina is experiencing a teacher shortage. One estimate is that the state will need to hire 12,000 teachers a year over the next decade. One approach to dealing with the shortage is NC TEACH, a statewide licensure program designed to recruit, prepare, and support mid-career professionals for a teaching career in the state. Mebane discusses the program and why professionals like chemists, accountants, and lawyers are attracted to it.
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Record #:
6834
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North Carolina has a teacher shortage. Contributing to this are retirements, resignations, a rapidly increasing school-age population, provisions of the federal No Child Left Behind Act that require all classroom teachers to be fully certified by the end of the 2005-06 school year, and a university system that does not graduate enough teachers to meet the state's needs. The state must hire 10,000 teachers a year; teacher college graduates in 2003 numbered 3,100, of which 2,200 were employed in North Carolina. Damico discusses the state's need to attract teachers, and then retain them; techniques used to fill teacher slots, like lateral entry and out-of-state recruitment; and ways to strengthen teacher recruitment and retention, like the N.C. Teaching Fellows Program, N.C. Teach, and Troops to Teachers.
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Record #:
6835
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North Carolina has a teacher supply problem. Growth in the number of school-age children and requirements of the federal No Child Left Behind Act contribute to this. McLaughlin discusses recommendations made by the North Carolina Center for Public Policy Research to deal with teacher shortages. One recommendation is for the N.C. State Board of Education to require by the 2005-06 school year, Teacher Retention Improvement Plans for all local school systems where turnover exceeds 15 percent.
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Record #:
25385
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Karen Singer, a science teacher at Central Farmville High School, explains what drew her to teaching. There are many reasons recent graduates don’t choose to teach at rural schools, but for Karen, those reasons were an attraction.
Record #:
25384
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Thanks to the Wachovia Partnership East program, ECU is recruiting more students to get degrees in teaching to help solve the teacher shortage crisis.
Record #:
27330
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Durham County has experienced a higher turnover rate for teachers than the state over the last 5 years. 19.2 percent of teachers left after the 2015-16 school year versus 14.2 percent of teachers across the state. This turnover rate is the tenth-highest in the state and higher than Durham’s surrounding school districts and counties. While half of teachers leaving the county leave teaching altogether, half are leaving for other reasons. It is argued that one of the biggest reasons is teacher pay. Durham offers lower supplements than its neighbors which may be a significant contributor to this trend.
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Record #:
28406
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The reasons behind why many teachers leave the profession are detailed. Over the past decade, approximately half of North Carolina’s teachers of the year, many local and regional winners, and other good teachers, have left public school teaching. The stories of several high quality teachers and why they chose to leave the profession are detailed here.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 11 Issue 37, September 1993, p10-12 Periodical Website
Record #:
35863
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Wiseman attended school in a one room schoolhouse with a new teacher nearly every year when he was a boy. When he was not at school or helping out on the farm, he spent his time hunting, fishing, swimming, and participating in various community events.