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15 results for Teachers--Salaries, etc.
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Record #:
2681
Author(s):
Abstract:
Comparing different states' average teacher salaries to determine which states are paying better can be misleading unless such factors as cost of living, amount of education, experience, and working conditions are considered.
Source:
Record #:
5611
Abstract:
Some educators are arguing for the implementation of a differentiated, or merit, pay system for teachers in North Carolina schools. The merit pay system is one in which the addition of extra salaries or bonuses is an incentive for superior teaching and better student performance.
Source:
Voice (NoCar LB 2831.624 N8 V6x), Vol. Issue , Spring 1993, p23-25, bibl
Record #:
5614
Author(s):
Abstract:
Comparative statistics regarding teacher salaries and other educational expenditures in North Carolina are charted and presented by the North Carolina Association of Educators.
Source:
NCAE News Bulletin (NoCar Oversize L 11 N822x), Vol. 24 Issue 7, June 1994, psupplement1-4 Periodical Website
Record #:
12210
Abstract:
The actual average salaries paid by the state, not including supplements, for the school year 1955-1956, are used as the basis for the calculation of what the 15% increase authorized by the General Assembly will bring teachers during the next two fiscal years. The figures for the actual salaries paid by the state are furnished by the statistical division of the State Board of Education. The figures and projections of the 15% increase are contained within a chart in the article.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 25 Issue 11, Oct 1957, p15-16
Full Text:
Record #:
12725
Abstract:
According to the 1961 General Assembly's education bill, North Carolina teachers' annual salaries can be as high as $5,605.50. This salary is possible if a teacher holds a Graduate Certificate and has 13 or more years of experience. In some school systems, supplements up to several hundred dollars a year can be earned in addition to an annual salary, raising the earning to $6,000 for one school year.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 29 Issue 12, Nov 1961, p10
Full Text:
Record #:
15518
Author(s):
Abstract:
Langston presents a plan for increasing teachers' salaries. In 1934, the length of a school term was eight months; this left a teacher the choice of stretching the $60 paid per month to cover the four unemployed ones or trying to find some summer employment. Langston's recommendation was to increase the school term to nine months and pay teachers for the extra month based on the present salary scale.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 2 Issue 37, Feb 1935, p5
Full Text:
Record #:
27330
Author(s):
Abstract:
Durham County has experienced a higher turnover rate for teachers than the state over the last 5 years. 19.2 percent of teachers left after the 2015-16 school year versus 14.2 percent of teachers across the state. This turnover rate is the tenth-highest in the state and higher than Durham’s surrounding school districts and counties. While half of teachers leaving the county leave teaching altogether, half are leaving for other reasons. It is argued that one of the biggest reasons is teacher pay. Durham offers lower supplements than its neighbors which may be a significant contributor to this trend.
Source:
Record #:
27013
Author(s):
Abstract:
On Valentine’s Day, thousands of North Carolina teachers protested in Raleigh for higher pay, more benefits, and an end to the Career Development Program. The program was designed to reward teachers with high ratings, but the North Carolina Association of Educators says it has failed. Teachers say that the program’s evaluation system encourages robotic teaching and does not consider content or students’ needs.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 7 Issue 4, Feb 23-Mar 8 1989, p9-12, por Periodical Website
Record #:
30723
Author(s):
Abstract:
A fifteen percent increase in North Carolina's teacher salaries will bring the average annual salaries of teachers in the state over $3500. This increase in teachers' pay would also increase the rank of North Carolina for teachers' salaries as one of the top five in the country.
Source:
Record #:
30786
Author(s):
Abstract:
State funds reaching over $108 million were paid in 1956-1967 for the salaries of 33,438 teachers, principles, and supervisors. There were 892 more instructional personnel paid that in the previous year, and the average classroom teacher received an average salary of $3,131.74. The North Carolina General Assembly was also able to set a pay schedule for teachers and principles related to educational degrees and number of teachers overseen, while retirement laws increased the minimum benefits for teachers, similar to other state employees.
Record #:
30885
Author(s):
Abstract:
A controversial subject in education, the North Carolina 1959 General Assembly is considered for the first time, merit pay for teachers. There are both pros and cons to the philosophy that those who excel at the job of teaching should receive better pay than those who perform poorly. It is argued that it keeps the better teachers employed through incentive, while others argue that the same pay schedule should apply to all teachers, regardless of performance.
Record #:
31033
Author(s):
Abstract:
The 1961 North Carolina General Assembly appropriated $427 million for the public school year, $15.5 million for vocational education, and over $5 million for the purchase of text books, and $5 million for new school buses. A new classroom teacher salary scale ranges from $3,607.50 to $5,605.50, making a 22.4 percent increase in salaries.
Record #:
31178
Author(s):
Abstract:
In an annual bulletin published by the National Education Association, North Carolina drops rank from 30 to 34 among the states in a comparison of the average salary paid public school instructional personnel. Despite a massive infusion of state support to raise the average salary, the state rank droops back to where it was several years in lagging to keep up with other state salary averages.
Source:
Record #:
31193
Author(s):
Abstract:
North Carolina's public school classroom teachers now have a new high salary, estimated at $4,975. However, compared to the per captia income for the state, it is little better than comparative figures from two fifteen years ago.
Source:
Record #:
38239
Author(s):
Abstract:
Governor Roy Cooper’s agenda includes capitalizing on the recent economic upswing that complements what the governor defines as the state’s strengths: absence of unions, low tax rates, focus on education. His cited strengths include greater bipartisan support, helping to partially eradicate HB2, and supporting the increase of teacher salaries and per-pupil spending.