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12 results for Wind power
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Record #:
7148
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The Coastal Wind Initiative, a project of the North Carolina Solar Center, seeks to educate national developers and local residents about areas in North Carolina where wind has the potential to produce electrical power. Reynolds gives an update on the progress of the project which was started in 2004.
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Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue , Spring 2005, p27-29, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
11391
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North Carolina has a long history of windmills dating back to the 18-century. Carteret County had the most with over 65 of the total of 155 documented ones found along the coast. Today, with emphasis on clean energy, new wind projects are under consideration along the mountain ridges and the coastal areas.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 77 Issue 3, Aug 2009, p32-34, 36, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
27688
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New mandates and goals to use more renewable energy have resulted in northeastern North Carolina becoming a place to generate wind and solar power.
Record #:
27932
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Former Duke University economics professor John Blackburn recently completed a study showing that wind and solar power combined could someday supply more than three-fourths of North Carolina’s electric power. Together, solar and wind power are highly reliable and inexpensive according to Blackburn. The utility companies disagree. The details Blackburn’s study and the position of the utility companies are explored.
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Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 27 Issue 20, May 2010, p7-9 Periodical Website
Record #:
28009
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Wind is the next big energy supply for the state of North Carolina. A recent study by UNC showed the state’s enormous potential for offshore wind energy and scientist, energy companies, and utilities are determining to make it a reality. The cost for beginning to capture wind energy would be great and it would take up to 10 years to generate power. The great potential for wind energy in the state is detailed and experts weigh in on its future in the state.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 27 Issue 36, September 2010, p9-11 Periodical Website
Record #:
30815
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French Broad EMC, an electric cooperative serving four western North Carolina counties and two in Tennessee, is a partner in the first rural wind power education program east of the Mississippi River. The project will install small wind turbines at three schools in Madison County and develop an alternative-energy curriculum for public schools as part of an effort to introduce wind power to rural communities.
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Record #:
31515
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Despite the breakdown of the wind generator on Howard’s Knob overlooking Boone, wind power is a feasible means of producing electricity. Dr. L. Linn Mackey of the Earth Studies Program at Appalachian State University said two smaller windmills he supervises demonstrate the workability of wind generation. The windmills are designed to reduce a household’s dependency on utility power by about half, and to occasionally generate power into power company lines.
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Record #:
31539
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The world’s largest windmill in Boone has a new generator, which will reduce the speed and noise of its blades. The change in generators also addresses community complaints about the machine’s interference with television reception. Further research is being done on how windmill operations influence the effectiveness of television antennas.
Record #:
31572
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The world’s largest wind-powered generator is being constructed on Howard’s Knob mountain, north of Boone. The windmill is part of a federal study to determine whether windmills are a feasible source of electrical energy and an alternative to fossil fuels. If successful, the wind generator could provide enough power to furnish electricity to more than five-hundred homes.
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Record #:
36245
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Discussed was the increasing role that farmers have been playing in the development of renewable energy industries such as solar and wind. Examples profiled were a solar farm owned by Charlotte based Birdseye Renewable Energy LLC, located on a three hundred acre farm in Robeson County. Noted also was Duke’s Dogwood solar farm in Halifax County.
Record #:
36262
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Promise noted in five profiled individuals, employed by North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University, also held a potential to enhance the quality of life. The research endeavors by these individuals promised to tackle issues such as obesity, colon cancer, emissions, and pavement quality.
Record #:
36312
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FLS Energy, a solar energy company, joined the ranks of other privately owned businesses with bright economic and occupational futures in North Carolina. Among the other 99 companies highlighted were Ennis-Flint, Rodgers Builders, Camco, Hissho Sushi, and Allen Industries. Factors these businesses often held in common included employees retaining majority ownership, being family owned, and starting with a single product.