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12 results for Aquaculture--North Carolina
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Record #:
19042
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North Carolina State University's Marine Aquaculture Research Center (MARC) is a hybrid of science and economics, proving that mariculture and aquaculture is feasible and can be inexpensive.
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Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue 1, Winter 2013, p18-23, f Periodical Website
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Record #:
19149
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North Carolina researchers are promoting small-scale aquaculture in the state and some family attempts have been very successful.
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Record #:
19308
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Americans are hungering for seafood, and North Carolina is attempting to keep up with the demand through various aquaculture projects such as trout farming and hybrid striped bass breeding.
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Record #:
19309
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North Carolina Sea Grant scientists have already proved that striped bass hybrids can be farm-raised. But how do they stack up in the marketplace? The hybrid has passed the test and is becoming an influential aquaculture crop for the state.
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Record #:
24051
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UNC Wilmington scientists conducted research about growing oysters in North Carolina with the hope to build the oyster aquaculture industry in the state. They developed tools and surveyed the state's aquaculture operations with the help of the North Carolina Sea Grant.
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Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue 4, Autumn 2015, p6-13, il, por, map Periodical Website
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Record #:
27769
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A sturgeon and caviar farm that was founded in 2004 in Happy Valley in Caldwell County, NC has just served its first sturgeon. The farm is the first in the state of North Carolina and only the fifth of its kind in the US. The farm raises Atlantic, Russian, and Siberian sturgeon and will sell its meat and caviar online, locally, and through a regional distributor. The process of raising the fish and the opinions of local chefs and consumers is explored.
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Record #:
28040
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Some farmers in North Carolina are switching from traditional crops to prawn aquaculture. Joe Thompson made the switch after he got injured and could not maintain a tobacco farm. Organizations like the Rural Advancement Foundation International-USA and the Golden Leaf Foundation are helping area farmers transition from tobacco farms. The farming of prawns yields a high profit with a low cost of labor and many area restaurants are eager to prawn’s on their menus.
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Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 27 Issue 45, November 2010, p34 Periodical Website
Record #:
28446
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Oyster farming is a rapidly expanding sector of the marine aquaculture industry in North Carolina. Current research is investigating different treatments to control fouling on oyster culture cages, and in turn, increase production efficiency and profitability for southern oysters.
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Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue 2, Spring 2017, p17-18, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
28790
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The partnership between oyster fishermen and scientists is a unique one. The Sandbar Oyster Company and the Institute of Marine Sciences of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill work together with local knowledge with scientific knowledge and data to harvest and study North Carolina’s oysters. Their partnership is good for business, education, and research.
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Record #:
30929
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A family owned fish farm in Fayetteville, NC offers more than just fresh fish. The Stone family's 102 acre Cedar Creek Fish Farm offers farm raised catfish and tilapia, as well as seasonal offerings like live crabs, shrimp, oysters clams and frog legs.
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CityView (NoCar F 264.T3 W4), Vol. Issue , Jul/Aug 2016, p58-61, il, por Periodical Website
Record #:
31218
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Aquaculture programs are appearing throughout eastern North Carolina, where fish farmers grow everything from catfish, hybrid striped bass and tilapia in ponds and tanks, to clams and oysters offshore. High schools are integrating aquaculture into the curriculum to teach students about this growing sector of agriculture. Students learn how to build and maintain the culture system, while applying their skills in science and math.
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Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 33 Issue 1, Jan 2001, p24-25, il, por Periodical Website
Record #:
32203
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North Carolina’s oyster farming industry is expanding and gaining an excellent reputation among seafood consumers. Scientists from the University of North Carolina Wilmington and Carteret Community College have partnered with commercial oyster farms to identify native strains of oysters best suited for farming and aquaculture.
Source:
Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue 1, Winter 2018, p6-11, il, por Periodical Website
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