NCPI Workmark
Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

Search Results


12 results for Police--Complaints against
Currently viewing results 1 - 12
PAGE OF 1
Record #:
3746
Author(s):
Abstract:
Stories of police brutality in larger cities, such as New York, do not surprise people. However, when it happens closer to home, many people are concerned. Recently, two cases of brutality were brought against the Durham Police Department. One was settled for $295,000. The other is pending.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 15 Issue 45, Nov 1997, p7-8, il Periodical Website
Record #:
24741
Author(s):
Abstract:
With the rise of black deaths at the hands of police officers, Charlotte barber Shaun Corbett developed the idea for a program called Cops & Barbers. The program began as a series of forums held in barbershops where young black men and cops talk to each other. It has since grown to include community service activities. The program gained national attention and President Obama’s office recognized it as a model for establishing relationships between cops and young black men.
Source:
Full Text:
Record #:
27327
Author(s):
Abstract:
The shooting of Keith Lamont Scott on September 20, 2016 by police officers in Charlotte prompted protesting in the city. Protesters marched and blocked Interstate 277 before being cleared from the road by police officers in riot gear using pepper spray. Community members were distressed at the police’s conclusion that the shooting and other incidents across the state and country involving violence toward individuals of color were justified. Community members are concerned with policing practices and believe that the steps being made to improve relations between police and the community are insufficient.
Source:
Record #:
27030
Abstract:
On February 29, white Raleigh police officer Daniel Clay Twiddy shot and killed an African-American man named Akiel Denkins near the corner of Bragg and East streets in Southeast Raleigh. Events such as this have resulted in mistrust of the police department. Proposed policy changes will consider employing body cameras and establishing a community oversight board with the ability to investigate and subpoena the police.
Source:
Indy Week (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57), Vol. 33 Issue 10, March 2016, p9-12, por Periodical Website
Full Text:
Record #:
27389
Author(s):
Abstract:
Moore’s Dinette in Creedmoor, NC remains closed despite James Moore’s acquittal in his case. Moore and his establishment were accused of disturbing the peace and being a public nuisance. Moore believes the charges brought against him were racially motivated and because he criticized the local police for their inaction. He is unsure whether he will reopen his business because his wife says that they feel as if they will be targeted.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 9 Issue 18, May 1-7 1991, p8-10 Periodical Website
Record #:
27573
Author(s):
Abstract:
Activist Eddie Hatcher remains in prison following his re-arrest on charges of kidnapping. Hatcher and Timothy Jacobs took hostages at the offices of the Robesonian to bring attention to the corruption of local law enforcement officers. Hatcher was acquitted in October of 1988, but re-arrested and has claimed he is a political prisoner. He believes there is a conspiracy against him and by holding him in Raleigh’s Central Prison’s “safekeeping” section as he awaits trial, state officials are trying to break him. Hatcher's personal history explored as he discusses his activism.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 7 Issue 38, November 23-29 1989, p7-8, 10 Periodical Website
Record #:
27623
Author(s):
Abstract:
Durham City Manager Tom Bonfield released his report to City Council about ways to improve the Durham Police Department (DPD). The report focused on the problems in the DPD, primarily with the way the police conduct searches and treat marijuana-related incidents. Bonfield acknowledged a lack of trust and transparency between the public and the DPD. Further findings from the report and their impact on citizens and the DPD are discussed and Durham City Council will discuss the report on Tuesday, Sept. 2.
Source:
Record #:
27773
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Alamance County Sherriff Terry Johnson and his office are under investigation by US Department of Justice over allegations that his office targets Latinos in traffic stops and checkpoints. The statistics support those allegations and there are concerns over civil rights violations. The sheriff's department claim they are following the law and Alamance County is a prime drug trafficking point for cartels. The department, its leadership, their actions, and the concerns of local citizens are explored.
Source:
Indy Week (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57), Vol. 29 Issue 33, August 2012, p18-21, 49 Periodical Website
Record #:
27783
Author(s):
Abstract:
Immigration court observers say government prosecutors continue to drop deportation cases in Alamance County. The amount of cases dropped is uncertain, but one estimate is over 24 cases have been dropped since September. The Department of Justice has been investigating the Alamance County Sheriff's office and has reported that the sheriff’s targeted Latino drivers and violated civil rights laws. Some activists believe a lawsuit is soon forthcoming against the department.
Source:
Indy Week (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57), Vol. 29 Issue 47, November 2012, ponline Periodical Website
Full Text:
Record #:
28062
Author(s):
Abstract:
Chapel Hill’s black community and many social activists say they are being unfairly targeted by the town’s police. Chapel Hill does not have an independent police review board, so only town leaders and the police know why 33 citizen complaints were filed last year. Residents want to change that review process to make it more transparent and hold police accountable to citizens. There has been a climate of fear and suspicion in Chapel Hill between the officers and certain citizens because of past actions by police and the lack of accountability.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 26 Issue 45, November 2009, p16-17 Periodical Website
Record #:
28061
Author(s):
Abstract:
Durham’s Civilian Police Review Board has little power to hold police accountable in Durham. The board cannot hear complaints unless police have vetted the complaints first. The board cannot initiate its own investigations. The board has no power to force the department to change its policies. The board and its members can only trust the police leaders will listen. Frustrations by board members and citizens are detailed.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 26 Issue 45, November 2009, p14-15, 19-20 Periodical Website
Record #:
28150
Author(s):
Abstract:
Durham resident Erick Daniels was wrongly convicted of robbery and spent seven years in prison before his recent exoneration. Daniels was wrongly convicted of robbing a police department employee when he was fifteen years old. The case has exposed poor investigative standards by the Durham police department and local prosecutors. The case has also tarnished Durham’s justice system.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 25 Issue 39, September 2008, p15-17 Periodical Website