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4 results for African American business enterprises
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Record #:
16860
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Abstract:
MIC is an acronym for the Mecklenburg Investment Company, an organization established in May 1921. A group of prominent black citizens in Charlotte formed MIC to rent space to other professional black professionals. These men were known at the time as the \"New Negro\" because of their middle-class, educated, and urban standing in the post-Civil War South.
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Record #:
4379
Author(s):
Abstract:
In the period after the Civil War, 1865-1890, some Afro-Americans in the Piedmont made substantial progress in the business world, with businesses rising from 9 to 104. Types of business included skilled trades, services, and mercantile. Durham was one of the most flourishing cities, with 110 black-owned businesses opening between 1890 and 1915. Berry O'Kelly and Warren C. Coleman were two of the most successful businessmen of the period.
Source:
Tar Heel Junior Historian (NoCar F 251 T3x), Vol. 29 Issue 2, Spring 1990, p28-30, il, por
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Record #:
27389
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Moore’s Dinette in Creedmoor, NC remains closed despite James Moore’s acquittal in his case. Moore and his establishment were accused of disturbing the peace and being a public nuisance. Moore believes the charges brought against him were racially motivated and because he criticized the local police for their inaction. He is unsure whether he will reopen his business because his wife says that they feel as if they will be targeted.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 9 Issue 18, May 1-7 1991, p8-10 Periodical Website
Record #:
34866
Author(s):
Abstract:
Located in downtown Fayetteville, Taste of West Africa is a restaurant which showcases West African food. Isabella Effon, a Ghanaian turned North Carolinian, moved to the state in 2001. She soon became involved with Umoja Group, a local non-profit which promotes African and Caribbean heritage. After showcasing West African food at a local event, she began receiving inquiries into where patrons could purchase more. Today, the restaurant remains popular and encourages North Carolinians to try food that may be a little outside of their comfort zone.
Source:
CityView (NoCar F 264.T3 W4), Vol. Issue , May/June 2016, p26-31, il, por Periodical Website
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