NCPI Workmark
Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

Search Results


19 results for Latinos
Currently viewing results 1 - 15
PAGE OF 2
Next
Record #:
27424
Abstract:
Evelyn Martinez moved to North Carolina nine years ago as a teenage boy, leaving her parents behind in rural Oaxaca, Mexico, after attempting suicide. She and other transgender Latinos are part of the Durham non-profit El Centro Hispano to help bring light to a new Southern community that has been hidden from view.
Source:
Indy Week (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57), Vol. 33 Issue 38, Sept 2016, p24-25, por Periodical Website
Subject(s):
Full Text:
Record #:
27680
Author(s):
Abstract:
The growing Latino community in the Triangle area and US has caused the market for Latin American music to grow over the past decade. This has highlighted the need to expand Spanish-speaking programming in the Triangle. Often, many Latin Americans have to travel great distances to attend concerts and events. Jorge Zuluaga and Juan Chavez recently created a production company called Raleigh Sonica to help produce a variety of programs that show diversity within the Spanish-speaking world and appeal to the Spanish-speaking community.
Source:
Record #:
27773
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Alamance County Sherriff Terry Johnson and his office are under investigation by US Department of Justice over allegations that his office targets Latinos in traffic stops and checkpoints. The statistics support those allegations and there are concerns over civil rights violations. The sheriff's department claim they are following the law and Alamance County is a prime drug trafficking point for cartels. The department, its leadership, their actions, and the concerns of local citizens are explored.
Source:
Indy Week (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57), Vol. 29 Issue 33, August 2012, p18-21, 49 Periodical Website
Record #:
27783
Author(s):
Abstract:
Immigration court observers say government prosecutors continue to drop deportation cases in Alamance County. The amount of cases dropped is uncertain, but one estimate is over 24 cases have been dropped since September. The Department of Justice has been investigating the Alamance County Sheriff's office and has reported that the sheriff’s targeted Latino drivers and violated civil rights laws. Some activists believe a lawsuit is soon forthcoming against the department.
Source:
Indy Week (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57), Vol. 29 Issue 47, November 2012, ponline Periodical Website
Full Text:
Record #:
27778
Author(s):
Abstract:
The number of Latinos registered to vote in the state has doubled since 2008 and Latinos have the potential to sway the election in North Carolina. Overall, the Latino voter bloc is young, but is not always politically engaged. Various reasons prevent participation in the election and some Latinos believe Obama has not kept his promises. Voting groups are still encouraging Latinos to vote and be involved as they will likely be the face of the state in the future according to demographic predictions.
Source:
Indy Week (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57), Vol. 29 Issue 45, November 2012, pOnline Periodical Website
Subject(s):
Full Text:
Record #:
27806
Author(s):
Abstract:
The story of how 31-year old Pedro Guzman was jailed for twenty-months due to a government mistake is detailed. Guzman was granted protected status as a legal immigrant after initially being jailed for a mistake his mother with her routine renewal of a work permit. ICE officials did not notify Guzman of his changed status and jailed him knowing he had no knowledge. He is married to a legal citizen and would have qualified to stay in the US under NACARA, but was still jailed. Guzman and his family describe the effects the event had on their lives and their future goals.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 28 Issue 21, May 2011, p13 Periodical Website
Record #:
28069
Author(s):
Abstract:
Orange County’s El Centro Latino has closed leaving Latinos in the area in need of many social services. The center provided information referral services and tutoring aid for students, English classes, job employment assistance, and more. The small nonprofit suffered from a high turnover in leadership and a lack of funding. Many area residents are upset and will have to travel to Durham or Chatham Counties to get help.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 26 Issue 48, November 2009, p5 Periodical Website
Record #:
28077
Author(s):
Abstract:
Recently, about 200 people joined the annual procession though Durham honoring La Virgen de Guadalupe, the Virgin Mary. The procession highlights the mixing of Catholicism and indigenous belief and of American and Mexican culture. In the essay, the author remembers living in San Antonio and compares the culture of acceptance toward Latinos versus her observation of animosity toward Latinos in North Carolina. The history of the holiday, Latino culture, and Latinos is America is discussed.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 26 Issue 50, December 2009, p9 Periodical Website
Record #:
28115
Author(s):
Abstract:
The stories of two siblings from Colombia and their experiences as undocumented immigrants are contrasted. One sibling has obtained legal residency while the other is still undocumented. Some difficulties for undocumented residents in North Carolina include being unable to get a driver’s license, being unable to afford out-of-state tuition for college, struggling to find a well-paying and safe job, and the fear of being deported. Nearly 270,000 North Carolina residents are undocumented and the number is growing each year.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 25 Issue 9, February 2008, p13-19 Periodical Website
Record #:
28137
Author(s):
Abstract:
North Carolina politicians, Republican Pat McCrory, Democrat Beverly Perdue, and Democrat Roy Cooper all want to bar aliens from attending community college. This would lead to a permanent underclass of unskilled, menial workers. The group which would be most affected are Mexican immigrants and the history of the oppression and hate directed toward immigrants in America is discussed in the current context.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 25 Issue 23, June 2008, p13 Periodical Website
Record #:
28144
Author(s):
Abstract:
Many immigrants who come to the US from Mexico return after being unable to find opportunities to work or during the winter when farm work is scarce. The Autobuses Adame bus line is often used to help immigrants return as the bus goes straight to the border and is not stopped by customs agents. However, the physical and emotional toll of the journey is difficult for many passengers.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 25 Issue 31, July 2008, p5-7 Periodical Website
Record #:
28190
Author(s):
Abstract:
In North Carolina, many Latinos are deported for minor offenses, not for serious crimes. Examples are provided of how many Latinos in the state have been deported for minor offenses through a process begun by local law enforcement officials under the 287 (g) program. Deportation for minor offenses is not the goal of the 287 (g) program, but local law enforcement have been straying from the rules in some cases. Alamance, Cabarrus, Cumberland, Gaston, Henderson, and Mecklenburg counties, the Wake County Sherriff’s office, and the Durham Police Department all participate in the 287 (g) program. Several graphs and charts provide statistics highlighting the trend.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 25 Issue 52, December 2008, p10-11 Periodical Website
Record #:
28290
Author(s):
Abstract:
More Latino supermarkets are popping up around the Triangle area. Area residents, owners, and cooks talk about how these markets help spread culture in the area and can encourage people to try making new foods at home.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 24 Issue 31, August 2007, p15-17 Periodical Website
Record #:
28300
Author(s):
Abstract:
Student activists from Student Action with Farmworkers work on migrant’s behalf in the fields and at the statehouse. The Durham non-profit brings college students together with farmworkers through a 10-week summer internship program. The interns work with advocacy groups to help migrants gain access to health clinics, teach them about the dangers of pesticides, and promote safety in the fields. Others assist migrants with union organizing, teach migrants about their legal rights, or lobby for statewide policy changes on farmworker and immigrant issues.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 24 Issue 33, August 2007, pOnline Periodical Website
Record #:
28351
Author(s):
Abstract:
El Futuro is the winner of a 2007 Indy Citizen Award. El Futuro is a nonprofit mental health center dedicated to treating the state’s underserved, and largely uninsured, Latino population. Founded by Luke Smith in Carrboro the group pooled the efforts of therapists and psychiatrists who spoke Spanish and were familiar with the culture of area Latinos. Staff members treat everything from immigration-related trauma and depression to sexual addiction and alcoholism through building relationships with their clients.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 24 Issue 47, November 2007, p17 Periodical Website