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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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14 results for Immigration--Hispanic
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Record #:
16955
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Over the past twenty years, changing processes of globalization and economic integration have sparked an increase in Latino transnational migration to the United States. In particular, this accelerated immigration and settlement of Latino families has profoundly reshaped the demographic, economic, cultural, and social landscape of North Carolina.
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North Carolina Geographer (NoCar F 254.8 N67), Vol. 11 Issue , 2003, p88-107, map, bibl, f
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Record #:
16993
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Over the past decade the Hispanic population has been fastest growing race/ethnic group in the United States. North Carolina is one state that has experienced a Hispanic population boom. However, this growth is not evenly distributed throughout the state. This article questions the driving forces that determine the location and growth mechanisms of Hispanic population clusters in the state.
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North Carolina Geographer (NoCar F 254.8 N67), Vol. 13 Issue , 2005, p46-58, map, bibl, f
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Record #:
16996
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The southeastern United States has received numerous Asian and Hispanic migrants since the 1980s. Certain counties in North Carolina receive larger distributions of these two ethnic groups that other counties in the State. Ravuri examines why certain ethnic groups are drawn to certain counties.
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North Carolina Geographer (NoCar F 254.8 N67), Vol. 14 Issue , 2006, p13-28, map, f
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Record #:
24148
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This book excerpt come from 'The Latino Migration Experience in North Carolina: New Roots in the Old North State' and discusses how new immigration has revived old fears about race, resources, and diversity in North Carolina.
Record #:
24165
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Hispanic immigration in North Carolina is decreasing. After two decades in which the state had the nation's fastest Hispanic growth, it is unclear why Hispanics have abandoned North Carolina or are arriving at a much slower rate. Some blame the recession and increased illegal immigrant laws.
Record #:
24209
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Illegal immigration is suppressing wages in North Carolina, but it is also creating new undercuts, which help businesses flourish. Without Hispanics, the state economy would come to a standstill because people would pay more for foreign goods rather than make them in the United States.
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Record #:
25559
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UNC researchers Hannah Gill and Mai Nguyen analyzed crime data from five North Carolina counties to investigate the U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement 287(g) program. Their analysis revealed high program costs, undocumented residents, and inaccurate arrests. Gill and Nguyen discuss the complexity of Hispanic immigrants in Alamance County and sociopolitical implications.
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Endeavors (NoCar LD 3941.3 A3), Vol. 27 Issue 1, Fall 2010, p40-44, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
25778
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Professors in the Department of Geography at East Carolina are examining the connection between rural North Carolina and a growing Latino population. In efforts to understand what draws this population to North Carolina, researchers are also offering programs that bridge the language and cultural gaps for new Latino residents in the state.
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Edge (NoCar LD 1741 E44 E33), Vol. Issue , Spring 2005, p31 Periodical Website
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Record #:
25900
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Anthropologist Hannah Gill is researching Mexican immigrants to North Carolina. Families in Mexico benefit monetarily from migrant labor, but family separation pays a toll. Gill also documented stories of kidnapped migrants and families smuggled across the border.
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Endeavors (NoCar LD 3941.3 A3), Vol. 22 Issue 3, Spring 2006, p18-20, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
27806
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The story of how 31-year old Pedro Guzman was jailed for twenty-months due to a government mistake is detailed. Guzman was granted protected status as a legal immigrant after initially being jailed for a mistake his mother with her routine renewal of a work permit. ICE officials did not notify Guzman of his changed status and jailed him knowing he had no knowledge. He is married to a legal citizen and would have qualified to stay in the US under NACARA, but was still jailed. Guzman and his family describe the effects the event had on their lives and their future goals.
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Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 28 Issue 21, May 2011, p13 Periodical Website
Record #:
28115
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The stories of two siblings from Colombia and their experiences as undocumented immigrants are contrasted. One sibling has obtained legal residency while the other is still undocumented. Some difficulties for undocumented residents in North Carolina include being unable to get a driver’s license, being unable to afford out-of-state tuition for college, struggling to find a well-paying and safe job, and the fear of being deported. Nearly 270,000 North Carolina residents are undocumented and the number is growing each year.
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Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 25 Issue 9, February 2008, p13-19 Periodical Website
Record #:
28347
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A recent community event in Chatham County focused on the socio-economic and cultural factors that drive immigrants to risk their lives to come to America. Despite the risks that come with leaving their homes, many Latinos feel the risk is worth it and that North Carolina is a favorable place to live. Speakers and attendees at the event talk about perceptions of America and how to fix some of the problems associated with the immigration system.
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Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 24 Issue 46, November 2007, p4 Periodical Website
Record #:
28954
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The story of Felipe Molina Mendoza shows how capricious and arbitrary America’s immigration system can be. Mendoza came to North Carolina from Mexico as an undocumented immigrant, and is openly gay. Mendoza describes the immigration process and anxieties surrounding deportation.
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Indy Week (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57), Vol. 34 Issue 5, Feb 2017, p10-14, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
36993
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Because of recent immigration trends, approximately forty percent of people receiving American citizenship were not born in North Carolina. Moreover, in nearly one-fifth of the state’s counties, naturalized citizens comprise a majority of the population. As for other ways naturalized citizens have affected the state, the author examines tangible and intangible factors. The tangible includes food and tradition; the intangible includes a sense of hope and determination.
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