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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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6 results for Migrant laborers
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Record #:
4052
Author(s):
Abstract:
Over 340,000 migrant workers, mostly Hispanic, labor on farms across the state. Exposure to pesticides, low pay, poor housing, unsanitary water, and long hours are some of the conditions workers deal with. For the agricultural industry, this cheap labor source has enabled it to rank second in the nation.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 17 Issue 6, Feb 1999, p17-21, il Periodical Website
Record #:
25900
Author(s):
Abstract:
Anthropologist Hannah Gill is researching Mexican immigrants to North Carolina. Families in Mexico benefit monetarily from migrant labor, but family separation pays a toll. Gill also documented stories of kidnapped migrants and families smuggled across the border.
Source:
Endeavors (NoCar LD 3941.3 A3), Vol. 22 Issue 3, Spring 2006, p18-20, il, por Periodical Website
Full Text:
Record #:
26233
Author(s):
Abstract:
For most migrant farmworkers in North Carolina, adequate health care seems unattainable. Migrant women, in particular, are challenged with raising children under harsh living conditions. To help improve their lives, researchers from the School of Public Health are working to make health care more accessible and effective.
Source:
Endeavors (NoCar LD 3941.3 A3), Vol. 6 Issue 1, Fall 1988, p6-9, il, por Periodical Website
Record #:
27343
Author(s):
Abstract:
The article draws attention to the working conditions of some migrant workers in North Carolina. Some employers lure primarily homeless or drug addicted, African-American men with promises and keep them as indentured workers. If they attempt to leave the workers’ camps, they are often physically threatened. Abuses also include inadequate housing and below minimum wage pay. There is not enough oversight of these camps according to advocacy groups in North Carolina.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 9 Issue 46, November 13-19 1991, p6-8 Periodical Website
Record #:
27209
Author(s):
Abstract:
The federal H-2A program enables North Carolina farmers to bring in foreign laborers for seasonal work through the Farm Labor Organization Committee. But migrant workers, such as those working at the Jackson Farming Company in Autryville, face unsafe working and housing conditions, wage theft, discrimination, and sexual abuse. Workers filed a lawsuit against Jackson farm, an unusual step taken by workers in the program.
Source:
Indy Week (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57), Vol. 33 Issue 25, June 2016, p10-14, il Periodical Website
Full Text:
Record #:
27550
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Hispanic population in the Triangle area is growing. Under new amnesty laws passed by Congress, many have been granted legal status. The population in the Triangle is likely around 10, 000 and the immigrant community is profiled. North Carolina has more favorable working and economic conditions than many neighboring states. Most work as migrant workers and construction workers and face many challenges adjusting to American culture and interacting with their neighbors.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 7 Issue 22, August 3-9 1989, p7-11 Periodical Website