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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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7 results for North Carolina--Emigration and immigration
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Record #:
7246
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The last great emigration from the Scottish highlands to North Carolina occurred in 1884, with the arrival of approximately 170 crofters in the Cape Fear River Basin area. Crofters were farmers who rented the land they worked. Within a few months, almost all of them returned to Scotland penniless. Bill Caudill, director of the Scottish Heritage Center and instructor of the College Piper Band at St. Andrews Presbyterian College in Laurinburg, discusses what went wrong.
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Record #:
21551
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This article examines a pamphlet circulated in the western highlands of Scotland that glowingly describes the opportunities in North Carolina during the 1770s. The pamphlet also describes the process by which a large number of Scots from Argyll, Skye, and Sutherland moved to North America during this time period.
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Record #:
24148
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This book excerpt come from 'The Latino Migration Experience in North Carolina: New Roots in the Old North State' and discusses how new immigration has revived old fears about race, resources, and diversity in North Carolina.
Record #:
7922
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Beach recounts Highland Scots immigration to North Carolina and how they dealt with the differences they encountered. The first organized immigration came in 1739, when 350 people from Scotland sailed to Wilmington and latter settled in what would become Cumberland County. New arrivals priorities included selecting land, surveying it, and planting crops. By the late 18th-century, the largest population of Scots outside Scotland lived in the state.
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Record #:
32988
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One man’s struggle to stay in the North Carolina town of Clinton after coming from, now German occupied (1942), Greece. Jim's story takes him from New York to Clinton to Honduras to New Orleans and New York again, Back to Clinton, to Cuba and finally permanently back to his home in Clinton. All the while, his boss and friend, along with some top NC officials, are fighting for him to stay.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 10 Issue 12, Aug 1942, p1-2, 21-22, por
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Record #:
34452
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In 1754, Captain Neil Campbell organized a singular voyage for Scottish immigrants looking to settle in the New World. This article discusses their emigration to the Cape Fear region and resulting settlement using historic records, maps, and written histories.
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Record #:
38954
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The author discusses how our early ancestors came by ship. They would later travel in 1755 by horseback, wagon or walking down the King’s Highway from Boston to Charleston, SC through eastern North Carolina. There was ‘The Fall Line Road’ through central North Carolina and The Upper Road’ in the 1740’s from Fredericksburg, VA to Macon, GA through the western Piedmont of North Carolina. The Great Valley Road started in Philadelphia and crossed the Piedmont of North Carolina ending in Augusta, GA. or go west out of Roanoke, VA to Knoxville, TN.