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13 results for Durham--Police department
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Record #:
1005
Author(s):
Abstract:
Durham's new police chief, Jackie McNeil, intends to change the city's reputation for crime and his department's poor public image.
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Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 11 Issue 10, Mar 1993, p7-9, por Periodical Website
Record #:
2268
Author(s):
Abstract:
To clean up their communities, neighbors in East Durham have joined forces with the Durham police. The program, Partners Against Crime, includes community policing, property redevelopment, and citizen involvement to help improve their neighborhoods.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 13 Issue 17, Apr 1995, p12-13, il Periodical Website
Record #:
3746
Author(s):
Abstract:
Stories of police brutality in larger cities, such as New York, do not surprise people. However, when it happens closer to home, many people are concerned. Recently, two cases of brutality were brought against the Durham Police Department. One was settled for $295,000. The other is pending.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 15 Issue 45, Nov 1997, p7-8, il Periodical Website
Record #:
4346
Author(s):
Abstract:
The police approach to domestic violence has changed. Formerly police saw stopping fights, separating the couple, and calming the situation as their job. The Domestic Violence Task Force in Durham is more pro-active. Procedures include sixteen questions for the investigating officer to ask; issuing warrants for the perpetrators; and follow-up work by the officers, such as keeping a file on further domestic violence and working closely with the district attorney in prosecuting the offenders.
Source:
Southern City (NoCar Oversize JS 39 S6), Vol. 49 Issue 10, Oct 1999, p1, 4-5, il
Record #:
27110
Author(s):
Abstract:
A coalition that includes the Durham city workers' union is vowing to pressure the city into halting plans for a new $71 million police headquarters. Coalition members demand reinvestment into services and institutions that serve the needs of marginalized community members. They also point out abuse and violence of the police department toward black and brown residents.
Source:
Indy Week (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57), Vol. 33 Issue 17, April 2016, p6, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
27121
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Abstract:
Incoming Durham police chief Cerelyn Davis held her first press conference Monday. She answered questions regarding marijuana enforcement, body cameras, crime, racial bias, and her controversial history in the Atlanta Police Department. Davis’ first day is June 6.
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Record #:
27159
Author(s):
Abstract:
Racial-justice groups protested in downtown Durham on Saturday. Shanika Biggs’ twenty-one-year old son, La'Vante, was shot and killed by Durham police officers last September. Investigations have concluded that there is no evidence of unlawful or criminally negligent conduct by law enforcement.
Source:
Indy Week (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57), Vol. 33 Issue 21, May 2016, p8, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
27478
Author(s):
Abstract:
Durham Police Department’s current proposal is to require police officers to wear body-cameras, but they have not yet clarified the path by which the public can actually see camera footage. This involves a tricky balancing act of protecting privacy and holding cops accountable.
Source:
Indy Week (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57), Vol. 33 Issue 6, Feb 2016, p10 Periodical Website
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Record #:
28150
Author(s):
Abstract:
Durham resident Erick Daniels was wrongly convicted of robbery and spent seven years in prison before his recent exoneration. Daniels was wrongly convicted of robbing a police department employee when he was fifteen years old. The case has exposed poor investigative standards by the Durham police department and local prosecutors. The case has also tarnished Durham’s justice system.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 25 Issue 39, September 2008, p15-17 Periodical Website
Record #:
28253
Author(s):
Abstract:
Erick Daniels is serving a ten-year prison sentence for an alleged armed robbery, but there is doubt about his involvement. Several sources indicate that another man attempted to confess to the crime for which Daniels was convicted. The sources, including Daniel’s attorney, his mother, another suspect in the case, and the woman who was robbed all talk about Samuel Strong’s potential involvement. Strong fits the description of the person who committed the robbery and is currently serving time for bank robbing.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 24 Issue 21, May 2007, p21 Periodical Website
Record #:
28252
Author(s):
Abstract:
Erick Daniels was sent to prison based on the shape of his eyebrows. Daniels is serving a ten year sentence for allegedly robbing Ruth Brown using a firearm. Daniels has maintained his innocence and there is much evidence to support his claims and more than enough evidence to constitute reasonable doubt. The questionable handling and investigation of Daniels case is detailed, along with interviews by Daniels, his mother, lawyers, and others familiar with the case.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 24 Issue 21, May 2007, p16-23 Periodical Website
Record #:
28774
Author(s):
Abstract:
Autopsy results appear to contradict the Durham Police Department’s account of Frank Clark’s death. Police claim that Clark was shot from behind while fleeing the police, but local residents are skeptical. They believe that the officers mistreat impoverished African Americans, particularly those, like Clark, with criminal records.
Source:
Indy Week (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57), Vol. 33 Issue 52, Jan 2017, p10-12, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
29030
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Abstract:
The Durham County Sheriff’s Office recently installed video monitors in the jail’s lobby to offer a safer alternative to moving inmates around the jail for visits, and to give inmates more visitation opportunities. Critics, however, contend that video visitation is a thinly veiled move to eliminate in-person visits altogether and profit from incarceration by eventually charging visitors to use the service.
Source:
Indy Week (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57), Vol. 34 Issue 17, May 2017, p11, por Periodical Website
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