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10 results for Durham--Social conditions
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Record #:
1085
Author(s):
Abstract:
Homeowners in Woodcroft, a housing subdivision in Durham that is predominantly white and upper middle class, fear the rise of crime in the city and feel that Woodcroft is a targeted area.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 11 Issue 18, May 1993, p7-9, por Periodical Website
Record #:
1126
Author(s):
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ACTION, Agencies Coming Together to Improve Our Neighborhood, is a Durham-based community program that encourages children and teens to be constructive and active with idle time.
Source:
Southern City (NoCar Oversize JS 39 S6), Vol. 43 Issue 5, May 1993, p1-16, por
Record #:
1752
Author(s):
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The city of Durham invited residents to city hall to view the documentary \"Kids Killing Kids,\" and followed with a town meeting aimed at airing concerns over and suggesting solutions to the epidemic of violence among children.
Source:
Southern City (NoCar Oversize JS 39 S6), Vol. 44 Issue 7, July 1994, p14, il
Record #:
2268
Author(s):
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To clean up their communities, neighbors in East Durham have joined forces with the Durham police. The program, Partners Against Crime, includes community policing, property redevelopment, and citizen involvement to help improve their neighborhoods.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 13 Issue 17, Apr 1995, p12-13, il Periodical Website
Record #:
25456
Author(s):
Abstract:
In Durham’s most blighted urban neighborhood, Rev. Ken Hammond has not only transformed the local church, but also challenged the community to support an academically rich private school free from the worries of gangs, drugs, and violence. Hammond, a pioneer of integration, has also become a servant leader, going beyond religious leader and encompassing economic and educational ministry.
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Record #:
27184
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The Home Owners' Loan Corporation pioneered the practice of redlining, selectively granting loans and drawing lines around black and low-income neighborhoods. In East Durham, the largest redlined areas also suffer from a lack of trees, as compared to richer, white neighborhoods. This shows how discriminatory federal policies from the past affect Durham’s tree canopy today.
Source:
Indy Week (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57), Vol. 33 Issue 23, June 2016, p10-11, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
27518
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Durham City Schools and Durham County schools are considering a merger. Members from the task force in charge of reviewing the merger share what they have learned and how the facts have changed them. Many members who were first opposed to the merger are now open to the idea and are beginning to talk to others about what changed their minds. The city schools are primarily African-American and poor, while the county schools are primarily white and wealthier. The merging of the two schools would save money and would improve the quality of education for the city schools.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 7 Issue 8, April 20-26 1989, p9-10 Periodical Website
Record #:
27517
Author(s):
Abstract:
A merger between Durham County Schools and Durham City Schools is being considered. A task force of community leaders is looking into the merger which would save the county money. The citizens of the county are unsure about the merger and it faces much opposition. Many issues are being raised including issues about race, class, identity, and whether the merger makes sense. Most citizens seemed concerned about what they will lose if the schools merge and whether it is best for their children.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 7 Issue 8, April 20-26 1989, p7-8, 11-13 Periodical Website
Record #:
28192
Author(s):
Abstract:
People are upset within Durham’s black community about a lack of leadership. Young, black leaders are present and visible in the community, but the older, more established black leaders of the Durham Committee on the Affairs of Black People are resisting their assumption of leadership positions. Some younger leaders are said to be more concerned with growing their businesses and holding onto their jobs rather than fighting for the community. Others believe that the Durham Committee’s infighting and lack of a defined agenda embraced by the community are preventing younger leaders from joining the group.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 24 Issue 2, January 2007, p10 Periodical Website
Record #:
28999
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Abstract:
The first edition of Artificer, a new column by the INDY's managing arts and culture editor, examines a revealing appearance of Durham in Marvel Comic's Champions. The comic portrays Durham’s social justice issues, inequality, racial diversity and progressive politics.
Source:
Indy Week (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57), Vol. 34 Issue 12, April 2017, p29, il Periodical Website
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