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11 results for Underground Railroad
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Record #:
2054
Author(s):
Abstract:
From Colonial days through the Civil War, a number of slaves, aided by slave watermen and sympathetic whites, escaped by the Maritime Underground Railroad, an ocean-going route to freedom along the North Carolina coastline.
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Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue , Nov/Dec 1994, p10-18, il, por Periodical Website
Record #:
4018
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Quakers in the Piedmont originated the first national Underground Railroad in the 1700s. This was a secret network of people and places set up to help slaves escaping to the North. It was not without danger for the Quakers, for anyone caught helping runaways could be punished.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 66 Issue 9, Feb 1999, p38,40,42-43, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
6386
Abstract:
On February 13, 2004, the Great Dismal Swamp will receive recognition for its role in the Underground Railroad path to freedom for slaves prior to the Civil War. The National Park Service has designated three sites in the swamp as part of the National Underground Railroad Network to Freedom Program. The sites are the Great Dismal Swamp National Wildlife Refuge, Dismal Swamp Canal, and North Carolina's Dismal Swamp State Park.
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Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 36 Issue 2, Feb 2004, p16, il, map Periodical Website
Record #:
15159
Author(s):
Abstract:
Levi Coffin was born near New Garden in Guilford and was a lifelong Quaker. His Quaker ideals conflicted with the institution of slavery and he became an integral member of the Underground Railroad. With his home in the Blue Ridge Mountains, Coffin aided 40,000 runaway slaves attain freedom at an estimated personal expense of $50,000 and possibility of imprisonment for law breaking. Coffin's efforts went beyond the Underground Railroad and he was responsible for the freedman's bureau while also establishing orphanages and travelling to Europe to oppose slavery.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 9 Issue 35, Jan 1942, p11
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Record #:
15677
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Abstract:
Part four of Gerard's eight-part series on the Civil War is about many of the runaway slaves from the eastern portion of the state who stole away along the rivers and swamps, desperately trying to reach the ocean and the \"nautical Underground Railroad.\" Before the war, slaves fled oppressive lives for a chance of freedom in the north but during the war many runaway slaves took up the Union's fight. Taking advantage of war time chaos, runaway slaves fled to the Atlantic shore and enlisted with either the Union Army or Navy.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 79 Issue 3, Aug 2011, p56-58, 60, 62, 64-65, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
23053
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This article describes historic methods of travel and highlights three important trails in North Carolina history, including The Great Wagon Road, the Trail of Tears, and The Underground Railroad.
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Tar Heel Junior Historian (NoCar F 251 T3x), Vol. 54 Issue 2, Spring 2015, p6-7, il, por, map
Record #:
27144
Author(s):
Abstract:
In 2020, the centennial of women's suffrage, Harriet Tubman will become the first woman in over a century to appear on U.S. paper currency, replacing Andrew Jackson on the twenty-dollar bill. This calls on us to remember North Carolina’s legacy of liberty at a crucial time.
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Indy Week (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57), Vol. 33 Issue 19, May 2016, p29, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
22658
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Abstract:
North Carolina's coastal region is home to a rich African-American history with locations that reflect the highs and lows for this group during and after slavery. For example, the Great Dismal Swamp became a place of refuge for those seeking freedom before and during the American Civil War as part of the Maritime Underground Railroad. Other places on this route, such as Wilmington, are known for their role in slavery, while James City is known as a place populated by freed blacks.
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Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue 2, Spring 2015, p28-33, il, por Periodical Website
Record #:
31107
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Abstract:
Research and the passing down of family stories have revealed many aspects of the secret signaling used to help slaves flee to freedom. One of the secret communication systems is the Underground Railroad Quilt Code. Symbols such as flying geese or monkey wrenches represented directions and tools required for the journey.
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Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 35 Issue 2, Feb 2003, p18-20, il, por Periodical Website
Record #:
37361
Author(s):
Abstract:
Perhaps not widely known is the role Washington played for escaped slaves, in securing freedom in a passage to the North. As for prior to slaves’ arrival at the Underground Railroad, noted were codes, songs, and quilt patterns containing information about planned escapes and uprisings on plantations. Also discussed was factors behind choosing Washington as a thoroughfare and information not so widely known related to the Underground Railroad. As for information collaborating with oral histories compiled by the Works Project Administration in the 1920s and 1930s, noted also was local Leesa Jones’s efforts in gathering orally passed down information from other locals about these topics.
Record #:
36403
Author(s):
Abstract:
The story of the Roberts House, near Mocksville, NC, which had a hidden tunnel from the house to Dutchman’s Creek. The tunnel may have been used during the Civil War and for the Underground Railroad.
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