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13 results for Slavery--History
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Record #:
7766
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In 1978, the Historic Jamestown Society was given the Mendenhall Plantation in Jamestown, North Carolina, as a donation from the owner, Mrs. W.G. Ragsdale. The plantation represented a part of the south that many people were not familiar with: the small farmer who did not depend on slave labor. James Mendenhall and his family were Pennsylvania Quakers who settled the area around 1762. They named the settlement between Salisbury and Virginia Jamestown after James. The plantation was built around 1811 by Richard Mendenhall, the son of the town's founder. The two-story, “hall and parlor” style structure had Flemish bond brick walls and arched openings. There is also a Pennsylvania-style barn on the grounds, which was once used to teach runaway slaves a trade. The Jamestown Society plans to open the site to visitors and furnish it with antiques from the period.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 54 Issue 4, Sept 1986, p22-23, il
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Record #:
15159
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Levi Coffin was born near New Garden in Guilford and was a lifelong Quaker. His Quaker ideals conflicted with the institution of slavery and he became an integral member of the Underground Railroad. With his home in the Blue Ridge Mountains, Coffin aided 40,000 runaway slaves attain freedom at an estimated personal expense of $50,000 and possibility of imprisonment for law breaking. Coffin's efforts went beyond the Underground Railroad and he was responsible for the freedman's bureau while also establishing orphanages and travelling to Europe to oppose slavery.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 9 Issue 35, Jan 1942, p11
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Record #:
19608
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Slavery in North Carolina was not addressed or recognized legally or by a governing body until it was given legal status by the General Assembly in 1715. From that point and continuing throughout the 18th- and 19th-centuries, laws were passed that gradually shaped the treatment and rights of slaves and an examination of these changes and of other efforts to effect changes in the law illustrate the attitudes of the people of North Carolina towards slaves' rights in this period.
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Record #:
19743
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The term \"free Negro\" for the purposes of this article refers to \"all free mulattoes, descended from Negro ancestors to the fourth generation inclusive, though one ancestor of each generation may have been a white person\" in the state before 1861. The author describes the state's population of free African Americans before the Civil War attempting to understand occupations, geographical concentrations across the state, and to quantify this group.
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Record #:
20027
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American historian John Spencer Bassett was a professor at Trinity College (now Duke University) and during the late 19th century expressed a liberal view of slavery and race problems within the state and the South. The author presents the basis of Bassett's opinions and examines lectures, papers, and books published by the historian.
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Record #:
20471
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The North Carolina slave code was not a product of legal theory or thought, but developed gradually based on the needs of the population. The code was intended to police the slave population and establish and maintain a unique social standard in the community. Later on the code, also developed the purpose of extending to slaves the basic civil privileges and personal security.
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Record #:
21402
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One of the best known but least demonstrative white North Carolinian with abolitionist sentimentalities was Hinton Rowan Helper. The anti-slavery movement in North Carolina has often been generalized by well-known but still racist, anti-slavery proponents who felt that all blacks were inferior to whites. The anti-slavery movement in North Carolina began with the gradual emancipationists during the 1780s-1820s which was then supplanted by the American Colonization Society and North Carolina Manumission Society during the 1820s and 1830s. No single group was dominant in the state after that period.
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Record #:
27810
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The families who owned the most slaves in the Triangle area are listed. The Camerons were the most prominent slave owners, owning over 900 slaves. The Watsons, Dunns, Alstons, Harrises, Headens, Haywoods, Joneses, Perrys, Mordecais, Rogerses, Smiths, Manlys, and Hintons were all major slave owners in the Triangle area. Cenus data from the 1860s is also included along with a discussion of population in North Carolina in the 1860s. Total slaves owned for each family is listed.
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Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 28 Issue 21, May 2011, p24 Periodical Website
Record #:
28244
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Prominent historian Dr. John Hope Franklin of Duke speaks out on the real work of ending discrimination. Franklin believes that apologizing for slavery and injustices done to African-Americans is not enough. Franklin also discusses the politics of slavery and the post-Reconstruction era. Topics covered in the interview include the Wilmington race riots, race relations, the taking down of statues of racist individuals, and his family's history.
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Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 24 Issue 16, April 2007, p7 Periodical Website
Record #:
30755
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BEFORE FREEDOM CAME is an exhibit originating at the Museum of the Confederacy in Richmond, VA in 1991, depicting African American life in the south before emancipation. Smith critiques a compact traveling version of the exhibit from the Smithsonian for how well it complements the other exhibits at an historic plantation site, the Mordecai House in Raleigh, NC, and for what it lacks with respect to a deeper economic and agricultural context to some of the exhibit pieces.
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Record #:
31197
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David S. Cecelski has produced the first major study of slavery on the North Carolina coast, published in his book called, The Waterman’s Song. In addition to detailed descriptions of the places, society and working conditions that maritime African Americans encountered, Cecelski recounts stories of individuals who lived through these times. He also discusses the role of slave fishermen in developing the traditional fishing culture in coastal North Carolina.
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Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 34 Issue 3, Mar 2002, p20-23, il, por Periodical Website
Record #:
34453
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Slaves and maroon communities were perceived as a threat to white property in Eastern North Carolina during the antebellum era. While slaves did have legal access to firearms during the colonial period, this access was revoked following the 1831 Nat Turner Rebellion in Virginia. This article discusses the use of black firearm laws as a means of protecting white property and mitigating the perceived black threat.
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Record #:
35508
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If history has two faces, as the author proclaimed, history textbooks have often held a mirror in front of one of those visages. Bunger’s purpose, then, was to make the other countenance, in this case the European slave trade, just as visible.
Source:
New East (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 4 Issue 3, June 1976, p40-43