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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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41 results for North Carolina--History--1775-1865
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Record #:
859
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Discusses the settling of Davidson County and the Cumberland Battalion, a state militia group, which was formed to protect the inhabitants from Indian rebellion.
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Record #:
1724
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Spanish captain Francisco de Miranda recorded in his diary his 47-day trip to North Carolina in 1783. His writings give insight into the infant North Carolina communities of the time.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 62 Issue 2, July 1994, p14-15, il, por
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Record #:
7836
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The majority of North Carolinian's delegates were Anti-Federalists who voted to reject the federal constitution in 1788. Out of 268 delegates in North Carolina William R. Davie, Alexander Martin, Richard Dobbs Spaight, Hugh Williamson, and William Blount were elected by the General Assembly to serve as founding fathers. The following year opinion shifted and North Carolina became the twelfth state to ratify the constitution.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 54 Issue 7, Dec 1986, p9-11, il, por
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Record #:
13175
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Written in 1848 and based on the travels of John Lanman, this article contains an excerpt from Lanman's book, Letters from the Alleghanies. This is the first article in a series by The State, detailing the mountains and western portion of the state prior to the Civil War.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 22 Issue 8, Sept 1954, p10-11, 45, il
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Record #:
13202
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Written in 1848 and based on the travels of Charles Lanman, this article contains an excerpt from Lanman's book, Letters from the Alleghanies. This is the second article in a series by The State, detailing the mountains and western portion of the state prior to the Civil War. The first part of this series can be found in the September 1954 issue, Volume 22, Number 8, pages 10-11, 45.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 22 Issue 9, Sept 1954, p10-12, 48, il
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Record #:
13318
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Abstract:
Written in 1848 and based on the travels of John Lanman, this article contains an excerpt from Lanman's book, Letters from the Alleghenies. This is the fourth article in a series by The State, detailing the mountains and western portion of the state prior to the Civil War. The first part of this series can be found in the September 1954 issue, Volume 22, Number 8, pages 10-11, 45. The second is in the September 1954 issue, Volume 22, Number 9, pages 10-12, 48. The third is in the October 1954 issue, Volume 22, Number 10, pages 14-15, 27.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 22 Issue 13, Nov 1954, p36-37, il
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Record #:
13349
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Abstract:
Written in 1848 as a chapter of the book, Letters from the Alleghanies, Lanman offers a description of Hickory Nut Gorge. Part of a series published by The State, Lanman discusses the removal of the Cherokee Native Americans. A traveler's account of rural encounters, his descriptions offer a glimpse of what it was like in North Carolina during the middle of the 19th century.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 22 Issue 20, Feb 1955, p17, 26
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Record #:
14998
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Holder describes the invasion of the Moravian territory on the northwest corner of the Wachovian tract, by the British forces who were in pursuit of General Nathanael Greene. British soldiers spent two days in the vicinity of Bethania.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 10 Issue 38, Feb 1943, p6-7, 20, il
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Record #:
15283
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On the Guilford Battleground near Greensboro is a monument to the exploits of Peter Francisco, giant of the American Revolution. He was said to have performed a deed of unparalleled bravery, cutting down eleven men with his sword, although badly wounded. At the battle of Camden, horses drawing a cannon were killed and Francisco shouldered the gun weighting eleven hundred pounds and carried it where it was needed.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 7 Issue 39, Feb 1940, p6-7, f
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Record #:
16861
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Thomas Harriet and John White were the earliest individuals to document the state's plethora of native flora but a series of other botanist followed to create a record of all varieties of plants. John Lawson, Mark Catesby, Arthur Dobbs, and Andre Michaux were all European visitors to the state who recorded details about plant species and sent specimens back to their native countries.
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Record #:
19599
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In this installment, documents pertaining to the 1788 Hillsboro Convention are reprinted. The convention met to discuss the Federal Constitution which the state did not ratify until November 21, 1789.
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Record #:
19633
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From the close of the American Revolution to the ratification of the United States Constitution there was a deep and increasing conviction among a considerable portion of North Carolinians that certain fundamental rights, based on the law of nature and guaranteed by various charters and statutes of England, were violated and jeopardized. This is the subject of the pamphlet anonymously published in the summer of 1787 under the title, "The Independent Citizen."
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Record #:
19640
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The author examines the 18th century coastline and the geographical impediments which hindered the state's overseas commerce. Discussed are the major bodies of water throughout eastern North Carolina including the Cape Fear River, the sounds, and Ocracoke Inlet and the men who sailed these waters and attempted to improve navigation throughout the period.
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Record #:
19634
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Despite sparse populations in the colonies, government was modeled on the English political system, including the use of borough representation. Borough representation persisted in the state through the early 19th century. Critics of borough representation presented a resolution to remove this from state politics at the Convention of 1835, defeated by a 73 to 50 vote.
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Record #:
19648
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An examination of recreational and cultural activities typical to an antebellum North Carolina town including sections addressing public social centers, private social activities, town clubs, sports, and summer resorts.
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