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Record #:
16707
Abstract:
Dr. James Norcom, a prominent figure in eastern North Carolina during the 19th-century, was an active local politician and respected doctor who was accused by his slave, Harriet Jacobs, as being ruthless and lascivious in her autobiography. Parramore examines the disparate portrayals of Dr. Norcom in Jacob's account and in historical records, concluding while aspects of Jacob's description are accurate, the doctor's sexual relations with his slaves and her overall characterization is prone to emotional exaggeration.
Subject(s):
Record #:
24617
Author(s):
Abstract:
As part ten of The Civil War: Life in North Carolina series, this article describes the interstate slave trade in North Carolina, the movement of male slaves to the western part of the state, and what the imminent end of the Confederacy meant for slaveholders, as well as slaves.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 82 Issue 5, October 2014, p213-214, 216, 218-220, il Periodical Website
Full Text:
Record #:
3146
Author(s):
Abstract:
Quakers felt the need to free their slaves but were prohibited by a 1741 law that stated only the state could grant freedom. To get around this, Quakers deeded slaves to the Yearly Meeting, which by 1814 had around 800. They were later moved out of state.
Source:
Tar Heel Junior Historian (NoCar F 251 T3x), Vol. 36 Issue 1, Fall 1996, p16-18, il, por
Record #:
27810
Author(s):
Abstract:
The families who owned the most slaves in the Triangle area are listed. The Camerons were the most prominent slave owners, owning over 900 slaves. The Watsons, Dunns, Alstons, Harrises, Headens, Haywoods, Joneses, Perrys, Mordecais, Rogerses, Smiths, Manlys, and Hintons were all major slave owners in the Triangle area. Cenus data from the 1860s is also included along with a discussion of population in North Carolina in the 1860s. Total slaves owned for each family is listed.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 28 Issue 21, May 2011, p24 Periodical Website