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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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9 results for Quakers
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Record #:
4018
Abstract:
Quakers in the Piedmont originated the first national Underground Railroad in the 1700s. This was a secret network of people and places set up to help slaves escaping to the North. It was not without danger for the Quakers, for anyone caught helping runaways could be punished.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 66 Issue 9, Feb 1999, p38,40,42-43, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
9955
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Jamestown, the 19th century Guilford County Quaker settlement founded by James Mendenhall, is the home to a group of historically significant buildings that have been put at risk by the North Carolina Highway Commission's plans to widen Highway 29A-70A. The Office of Archives and History, the State Professional Review Committee and the High Point Historical Museum have all participated in having the area declared a Historic District, an act that will require any federally funded local projects to undergo a special review process and that will hopefully encourage planners to seek an alternate route for the highway.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 40 Issue 18, Apr 1973, p22-23, 43, il
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Record #:
13136
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The Quakers of a century ago were recognizable by their hats. At Guilford College Library is a hat worn by Nathan Hunt, often referred to as the patriarch of Quakerism in North Carolina. Richard Beard settled with the Quaker colony near what is now High Point; he brought with him some knowledge of the manufacture of hats.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 23 Issue 14, Dec 1955, p11, por
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Record #:
20849
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This article examines the antiwar stance and general perspectives on the American Revolution held by the North Carolina Friends (Quakers). All nature of Friends life and culture related to this period is examined including analysis of minutes from Friends monthly, yearly, and council meetings, discussion of the disowning of members who took up arms as well a look at those who joined the Friends during this period, the taxing of Friends members, Friends involvement in the care of war wounded, and Friends' burial traditions.
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Record #:
20904
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This article looks at the evolution of Quaker Friends' efforts to oppose and end slavery via the development of a manumission society dedicated towards the emancipation of slaves. The efforts, philosophies, attitudes and actions of the society in North Carolina are further detailed.
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Record #:
3146
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Quakers felt the need to free their slaves but were prohibited by a 1741 law that stated only the state could grant freedom. To get around this, Quakers deeded slaves to the Yearly Meeting, which by 1814 had around 800. They were later moved out of state.
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Tar Heel Junior Historian (NoCar F 251 T3x), Vol. 36 Issue 1, Fall 1996, p16-18, il, por
Record #:
31232
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Cane Creek Friends Meeting is a Quaker community in Snow Camp, Alamance County, which formed in 1751. As the Piedmont’s oldest active Quaker Meeting community, Cane Creek celebrates its 250th year during the first week of October 2001. This article describes the Quaker community’s history and heritage, and provides information about upcoming events.
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Record #:
31411
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In Great Britain, the Religious Society of Friends originally faced unanimous hostility from the ruling classes and persecuted by the established church. However, early Quakers went their quiet ways and flourished in the time of the industrial revolution and expanding world commerce. With a freedom of trade and voluntary efforts and funds, Quakers thrived in the new America, a legacy that continues in the current United States.
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Record #:
35698
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NC’s plays about the Lost Colony of Roanoke, Blackbeard, Tom Dooley, Daniel Boone, and Andrew Jackson may come as no surprise. This state was a home for the famous pirate and Elizabethan era English settlers, the subject of the popular song, battle site for this Revolutionary War freedom fighter, and settlement that included Jackson’s parents. Plays about NC’s perhaps lesser known ways of involvement in the Revolutionary War included Fight for Freedom, about the first Declaration of Independence document; The Liberty Cart, about the Battle of Moore’s Creek. As for contributions from religious groups, there was Sound of Peace, about a Quaker settlement in Snow Camp. From this Day Forward traced the life of the Walden family, whose descendants and bakeries still exist in Valdese.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 7 Issue 3, May/June 1979, p18-21