NCPI Workmark
Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

Search Results


5 results for North Carolina--History--Civil War, 1861-1865--African Americans
Currently viewing results 1 - 5
PAGE OF 1
Record #:
1900
Author(s):
Abstract:
Two sketchbooks by a Union soldier, James Wells Champney, have been acquired by the North Carolina Maritime History Council. Nearly 400 drawings depict camp, fort, and African-American life in Eastern North Carolina during the war.
Source:
Record #:
18098
Author(s):
Abstract:
Recruiting slaves to serve in segregated regiments was a Union tactic to bolster ranks throughout the war. This article looks at a specific case in North Carolina centered on Abraham Galloway, an outspoken African-American man and escaped slave. Galloway became a respected leader both during the war as a ferocious fighter and afterwards as an elected politician.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 80 Issue 5, Oct 2012, p60-62, 64, 67, 69-71, il Periodical Website
Full Text:
Record #:
20025
Author(s):
Abstract:
The third installment (see volumes XXXI and XXXII of this journal) in a series of articles concerning African Americans during the Civil War, the author focuses on how slave owning citizens of the state attempted to maintain the status quo through legislative and social means. Fear of slave uprisings prior to the Civil War had cast a more conservative grip on the state's slave population which, before 1835, benefited from more liberal agendas like voting rights and better education for African Americans. The author examines through newspaper accounts, legal documents, and personal correspondence how the suppression of African Americans during the war deepened as the slave holding population became more fearful of losing control.
Full Text:
Record #:
24617
Author(s):
Abstract:
As part ten of The Civil War: Life in North Carolina series, this article describes the interstate slave trade in North Carolina, the movement of male slaves to the western part of the state, and what the imminent end of the Confederacy meant for slaveholders, as well as slaves.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 82 Issue 5, October 2014, p213-214, 216, 218-220, il Periodical Website
Full Text:
Record #:
14385
Author(s):
Abstract:
In 1862, Union troops under General Ambrose Burnside occupied New Bern and a large portion of Eastern North Carolina. Escaping slaves found a safe haven behind their lines and soon became a source of wartime labor and even military service for the Union. A number formed a community of churches, schools, and homes on Roanoke Island which soon grew to 3,500 men, women, and children by 1864. Lanier interviewed Virginia Simmons Tillet, one of the colony's descendants, about this little-known Civil War story.
Source:
Tar Heel Junior Historian (NoCar F 251 T3x), Vol. 50 Issue 2, Spring 2011, p37-39, il, por