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11 results for Dismal Swamp (N.C. and Va.)--History
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Record #:
2527
Author(s):
Abstract:
Sprawling across the state's northeastern corner and in southeastern Virginia, the Great Dismal Swamp attracts visitors interested in history, wildlife, and outdoor adventure.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 63 Issue 5, Oct 1995, p24-28, il
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Record #:
5835
Abstract:
The Great Dismal Swamp, an area of history and mystery, sprawls across North Carolina's northeastern corner and southeastern Virginia. No one knows who discovered it or when. The author discusses historical events and persons connected with the swamp.
Source:
New East (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 1 Issue 3, June/July 1973, p24-26, 28-29, il
Record #:
5975
Abstract:
Located on the marshy coast of North Carolina and Virginia, the Great Dismal Swamp, once covering 2,200 square miles, has been described as an area of history and mystery. Blackburn discusses historical events and persons connected with the swamp, such as George Washington, who designed a plan to drain the swamp.
Source:
New East (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 4 Issue 2, Mar/Apr 1976, p40-42, il, map
Record #:
6386
Abstract:
On February 13, 2004, the Great Dismal Swamp will receive recognition for its role in the Underground Railroad path to freedom for slaves prior to the Civil War. The National Park Service has designated three sites in the swamp as part of the National Underground Railroad Network to Freedom Program. The sites are the Great Dismal Swamp National Wildlife Refuge, Dismal Swamp Canal, and North Carolina's Dismal Swamp State Park.
Source:
Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 36 Issue 2, Feb 2004, p16, il, map Periodical Website
Record #:
10286
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Great Dismal Swamp, an area of history and mystery, sprawls across North Carolina's northeastern corner and southeastern Virginia. No one knows who discovered it or when. Parker discusses historical events and persons connected with the swamp.
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Record #:
13951
Author(s):
Abstract:
The juniper water of the Dismal Swamp was considered a cure-all for many ailments, and nearly a century ago the Dismal Swamp gave promise of becoming a great health resort.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 18 Issue 16, Sept 1950, p12-13, il
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Record #:
14186
Author(s):
Abstract:
Of all the many famous people who have ever visited The Great Dismal Swamp, few were ever entertained more informally than was Andrew Jackson.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 17 Issue 38, Feb 1950, p3, 22, il
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Record #:
6072
Author(s):
Abstract:
Once covering 1.4 million acres, the Great Dismal Swamp has been reduced to 210,000 acres over the last 200 years. Eroding water tables, 200 years of logging, especially of the Atlantic white cedar, and an elaborate network of ditches cut through the swamp have all contributed to the reduction of this mysterious, dank, and nearly impenetrable area. Yet, the swamp stubbornly clings to survival.
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Record #:
35568
Author(s):
Abstract:
This patch of swamp, ironically called barely habitable, has generated life and livelihood over the past two centuries. During its Colonial life: construction site for a canal, spearheaded by George Washington. During its Confederate past: inspiration for novelist Harriet Beecher Stowe. Early twentieth century: moneymaker site for commercial tour boat owners. Today: debating ground for establishing public recreation or water management sites.
Source:
New East (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 1 Issue 3, June/July 1973, p24-26, 28-29
Record #:
38124
Author(s):
Abstract:
It’s actually a replica of the lighthouse built in 1886 and copies the screw-pile design of the original. However, the Roanoke River Lighthouse in Plymouth reveals a genuine interest in and truth about the lifeways of an earlier time in Eastern North Carolina. Included is a timeline for that’s representative of both this lighthouse and the time period in which it was constructed.
Record #:
38958
Author(s):
Abstract:
The author of this article gives an overview of the size and fauna of the Great Dismal Swamp. She talks about the early Indians and the colonies of ‘maroons’ runaway slaves, who called the Great Dismal Swamp home. The Great Dismal Swamp and the maroons have been immortalized in literature by such writers as Harriet Beecher Stowe, Henry Wadsworth, Moses Grandy and Frederick L. Omstead, among others.