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11 results for Methodist Church--North Carolina
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Record #:
13996
Author(s):
Abstract:
The centennial celebration of the Methodist Church in North Carolina occurred seventy-five years ago last week. The church has made remarkable progress throughout all of the state.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 18 Issue 44, Mar 1951, p8-9, por
Full Text:
Record #:
27435
Author(s):
Abstract:
Jimmy Creech, the minister of Raleigh’s Fairmont United Methodist Church is the subject of controversy for his position on homosexuality. Creech was part of a group of clergy who supported gay individuals in response to an anti-discrimination suit. For his support, 85 parish members petitioned to remove him as the church’s pastor. Creech, gay individuals, and parishioners voice their concern and opinions over the United Methodist Church’s and the Bible’s position on homosexuality.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 8 Issue 3, Jan. 18-24 1990, p7-11 Periodical Website
Record #:
27919
Author(s):
Abstract:
In 1772, Anglican priest John Wesley sent Joseph Pilmore to New Bern, North Carolina to extend the work of the Methodists. The Methodists of New Bern became the most numerous denomination in the area. In 1843 the Centenary Methodist Church was built and named for the the fact that the religious reawakening of the church was about one-hundred years after the Aldersgate experience of John Wesley.
Source:
Record #:
29117
Abstract:
Presented are several documents in the Cherokee language about the life at the Echota Methodist Mission on Qualla Boundary in the middle of the 19th century. Most of the documents were written by Inoli a Methodist preacher and keeper of the townhouse records. The documents discuss minutes from Sunday School, the conversions of members to the church, and information about early Christian figures.
Record #:
34598
Abstract:
While a Methodist chapel pre-dated the establishment of Morehead City, it was razed during the Civil War. The first Methodist Episcopal Church was built in 1884 to replace the chapel. Throughout the 19th and 20th centuries, the congregation grew and required further infrastructure including a meeting room, kitchen, and classrooms. In 1960, the educational building was again expanded with the addition of a new wing. The congregation celebrated its 200th anniversary in January 1998 and continues to thrive in Morehead City.
Source:
The Researcher (NoCar F 262 C23 R47), Vol. 15 Issue 1, Summer 1999, p10-12, il
Record #:
34629
Author(s):
Abstract:
This article is a reprint of a 1920 newspaper article addressing Chautauqua in Carteret County. Chautauqua, an extension of Methodist camp meetings, was a congregational gathering which emphasized community strength and revitalization. The 1920 Chautauqua in Carteret County required additional funding from community members.
Source:
The Researcher (NoCar F 262 C23 R47), Vol. 16 Issue 2, Summer 2000, p18-19, il
Record #:
36016
Abstract:
It was a lost art to America in general, perhaps. In Hatteras Island, Mrs. Brittie Burrus proved interest in quilting could be found in girls who were part of the Methodist Church’s Day Circle.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 1 Issue 1, Spring/Summer 1980, p62-63
Record #:
35990
Abstract:
The former Maude Miller had an eventful career history. She was first a schoolteacher at what was called a "pay school" by Hatteras Island residents. She became the county welfare supervisor during the 1930s, gaining experience with the Depression’s effects on the Island. As a postmistress, she was second generation employee (her father served during the 1800s). During World War II, she was a Coastal Observer, with the Navy issuing a service certificate. Of her late husband, Estus Preston White, she noted their common work background in education, with his work on the Board. His local administrative roles included chairman of Methodist Sunday School and electric plant, as well as county administrative work as a commissioner.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 3 Issue 3, July 1976, p52-59
Record #:
35998
Abstract:
Among Mrs. Cynthia Rollinson’s recollections of life were the lives she helped delivered as a midwife. As for life from decades ago, she could attest to a time when homes had ice boxes instead of refrigerators. She could also attest to a way Hatteras Island seemed futuristic, even in its dependency on kerosene as a light source: it had windmills.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 4 Issue 3, Spring 1978, p42-43
Record #:
36029
Author(s):
Abstract:
Glimpses of the past were perhaps seen most clearly in this collection of photos. One was a reminder of when the ferry was the only source of transport for humans and cargo. Others were reminders of businesses long since gone out of business, as well as buildings still standing. Most the photos, though, attested the importance of waterways around the Island, whether the creek familiarly known as the “Slash,” Core Sound, or Atlantic Ocean.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 3 Issue 1, Spring/Summer 1985, p30-39
Record #:
36021
Abstract:
Its recently celebrated centennial history included the destruction of its first structure by the Hurricane of 1933. As donations and many member fundraising efforts proved, a house of God wasn’t made just from newer wood and nails, not even the original lamps and piano.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 2 Issue 1, Fall/Winter 1982, p18-19