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7 results for Hurricanes--Carteret County, 1933
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Record #:
6820
Abstract:
North Carolina has had many memorable hurricanes, including Hazel, Diane, and Floyd; but the '33 Storm, as it is called, seems to top them all. The storm struck Carteret County on September 15, 1933. It lingered at least twelve hours, with gusts at 120 to 140 miles per hour. The massive storm spawned many tornadoes, and at its height, over half of Carteret County was under water. Carraway describes the storm and includes a listing of each Down East town and the damage it sustained.
Source:
The Researcher (NoCar F 262 C23 R47), Vol. 19 Issue 2, Winter 2003, p3-6, il
Record #:
34479
Author(s):
Abstract:
September, 1933, a hurricane slammed the Outer Banks causing substantial damage to personal property. Nurses from the American Red Cross were instrumental to community recovery through disease prevention and rendered aid. This article contains oral histories from two of the nurses and describes damage from the storm.
Source:
The Researcher (NoCar F 262 C23 R47), Vol. 8 Issue 3, Summer 1992, p13-15
Record #:
34785
Author(s):
Abstract:
The annual Lukens homecoming is held to remember the small community of Lukens in Carteret County. First settled during the 18th century, town residents began leaving following extensive damage from the 1933 hurricane. Today, Lukens descendants and family members return once a year to share histories of the community. Descriptions of the town and residents are given by those present. A trip to Lukens follows the remembrances. Today, some of the Lukens structures are still standing in South River, North Carolina.
Source:
The Researcher (NoCar F 262 C23 R47), Vol. 25 Issue 1, Fall-Spring 2009-2010, p7-8, il
Record #:
36025
Abstract:
Clarence Jennette’s memories recalled were of the area’s well-known 1933 and 1944 hurricanes. The Hatteras residents’ method of battening down the hatches and waiting it out—has proven to help them weather any storm.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 3 Issue 1, Spring/Summer 1985, p8-9
Record #:
36021
Abstract:
Its recently celebrated centennial history included the destruction of its first structure by the Hurricane of 1933. As donations and many member fundraising efforts proved, a house of God wasn’t made just from newer wood and nails, not even the original lamps and piano.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 2 Issue 1, Fall/Winter 1982, p18-19
Record #:
36026
Abstract:
This article, part of a series for this edition, recounted Hatteras Island’s experience with the well-known 1933 and 1944 hurricanes. What it has in common with “Storm Memories” was personal accounts, in this case of a family, the Austins, rather than an individual, Clarence Jennette.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 3 Issue 1, Spring/Summer 1985, p12-13
Record #:
36028
Author(s):
Abstract:
This article, part of a series for this edition, chronicled Hatteras Island’s encounters with well-known 1933 and 1944 hurricanes. This recollection by Ernal Foster, included photos illustrating the 1933 storm’s impact, proved pictures can be worth a thousand words.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 3 Issue 1, Spring/Summer 1985, p15-17