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5 results for Graffenried, Christoph von, Baron, 1661-1743
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Record #:
36124
Abstract:
Expected was the 1910 celebration: it was the bicentennial of New Bern’s founding. As for one not expected, the author explained its coming from the “tenor of the times.” It, hosted by the newly created historical society, had a guest list including descendants of Baron Christopher de Graffenried and Colonial homes open to visitors. Another aspect remembrance worthy was the first contribution to Tryon Palace’s 1950s restoration, a surplus from funds for the 1929 event.
Record #:
36127
Author(s):
Abstract:
Among New Bern’s founding fathers were Baron Christopher deGraffenried, also known as Baron Christopher von Graffenried. His prominent place in the town’s history could be justified by founding the regarded center of the town and its Colonial life: a church. Though not be regarded the center any longer, the church still held an important place. That may be defined by its tombstones’ names, reflected in contemporary families, and mirrored in its architecture, a timely reflection.
Record #:
36128
Abstract:
The historical reports and map representing Colonial New Bern were compiled by Baron Christoph deGraffenried, also known as Baron Christoph von Graffenried. An enduring connection was seen in the descendants of von Graffenried, some who attended the unveiling of the bust commemorating the town’s founder.
Record #:
36154
Abstract:
A life ended at thirty-six exuded influence spanning two centuries: a city park, street, creek, and bridge named for him. Evidence perhaps obscure, though, was produced during his lifetime: John Lawson’s History of North Carolina (1705).
Record #:
36153
Abstract:
The question: who owned the land, the German Palatines or Swiss paupers. The answer: evident in the descendants for those two groups. After two centuries, they still reside in the area named New Bern by their ancestors.