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12 results for Craven County--Historic buildings
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Record #:
20080
Abstract:
This article examines the importance of public buildings in the early life of North Carolina, with a focus on buildings in Craven County. Particular attention is given to courthouses, jails, to city centralization and town lot legislation, the effect of the revolutionary war on public buildings, taxes and legislation for public buildings.
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Record #:
24646
Author(s):
Abstract:
Tryon Palace in New Bern opens to the public April 2, 1959. The original building was commissioned in 1767 by Royal Governor William Tryon (1729-1788); John Hawks (ca. 1734-1790) served as the architect. This article discusses the building’s history and the restorations leading up to its grand opening.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 26 Issue 22, April 1959, p8-9, il
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Record #:
36989
Abstract:
A pioneering female photographer, with a body of work including 600,000 photographs, also left behind the clapboard house where her career began. Among the accomplishments her historic house became the site of was designing the first Pepsi-Cola logo for the pharmacist who invented the beverage.
Record #:
37417
Author(s):
Abstract:
George Dixon’s loss of dwelling and dream was the Palace’s gain, as one of the three historical homes for tour at the Palace. How Dixon lost this home, through a series of financial misfortunes, is described in detail. Described nearly as well are the owners, occupiers, and renters who resided in the Federal style dwelling before it became part of Tryon Palace’s architectural showpieces in 1957.
Source:
The Palace (NoCar F 264 N5 P3), Vol. 12 Issue 1, Winter 2013/2014, p26-29
Record #:
36126
Abstract:
This exploration of the prominent family spotlighted Samuel Chapman, whose daughter Caroline contributed to the construction of the Attmore-Oliver House. An examination of his life included positions such as clerk of the County’s Superior Court, secretary of New Bern Academy’s board of trustees, and senior warden of St. John’s Lodge, number 2. Chapman’s life was also reflected in his will, in which he also left his mother, wife Catherine, and son Henry his worldly goods. As for his slave woman Juliet’s son, possibly being Chapman’s son would explain Nathan’s emancipation and share of the family fortune.
Record #:
36127
Author(s):
Abstract:
Among New Bern’s founding fathers were Baron Christopher deGraffenried, also known as Baron Christopher von Graffenried. His prominent place in the town’s history could be justified by founding the regarded center of the town and its Colonial life: a church. Though not be regarded the center any longer, the church still held an important place. That may be defined by its tombstones’ names, reflected in contemporary families, and mirrored in its architecture, a timely reflection.
Record #:
36123
Author(s):
Abstract:
New Bern’s denizens have an equivalent of Tara on Washington Post Road. The dwelling built in 1760 translated the reel version of antebellum South to real life, as the Spaight family, the builders of Bellair, experienced it. Thompson’s article offers another connection with Bellair by a letter written in the house in 1776 by Mary Murphrey.
Record #:
36125
Author(s):
Abstract:
Craven County’s seat can count as part of its illustrious history: becoming the state capital in 1767 and site for the Governor’s new home that year. Even if it played such a role for only twenty-seven years, assured was its permanent place in New Bern’s history, as Tryon Palace.
Record #:
36134
Author(s):
Abstract:
All Saints Chapel, built in the late 1890s and constructed in the Carpenter Gothic Style, was larger than its exterior suggested. As for other aspects of its appearance, longtime residents recall the exterior as painted white, but research by the author asserted otherwise. In fact, the recent repainting has returned the church to its original color, as well as the color scheme popular during the period in which the church was built.
Record #:
36129
Abstract:
This edition resumed where the first concluded, with the purchase of Caroline and Henry Chapman’s house by Isaac Taylor for his daughter, Mary, her husband, George Attmore, and their two children. Included in this profile of Isaac Taylor was information about his daughter and son in law’s children, which totaled seven. Also discussed were Mary and George’s daughter Hannah, her husband, William Oliver, and their eight children.
Record #:
36130
Author(s):
Abstract:
Moving day involved the Coor-Cook House, whose construction began in the 1790s, and Law Office, built in the 1850s. The two buildings, moved in 1981, were purchased by the Historic New Bern Foundation. The buildings’ value was expressed in the Foundation not wanting them demolished to make way for parking lots or an extension of the court house.
Record #:
36132
Author(s):
Abstract:
Miss Mary was Mary Taylor Oliver, with whom the author lived in the 1920s. She proved herself impressionable through a close friendship with the author’s father; operating her father’s insurance agency; and characteristics such as integrity.